Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

The German amphibious airbase at Copenhagen


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Armand

Armand

    About the same age as another old Fokker: The F-27

  • Forum Guru
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,746 posts
  • Joined 4 Years, 3 Months and 1 Day
  • 117 topics
  • LocationAbout 20 nm east of BLL

Posted 03 April 2018 - 12:04 AM

As i just came by this picture and never have seen anything from the scene, i have to consider it rare, hence might be of interrest to you too.
As the topic reveal, it's the airbase of the Danish Navy close to Copenhagen, however during the German occupation.
At Aalborg in Northern Denmark was a likely amphibious airbase built by the Germans, however here the aircraft was moored along a pier and the only access to ground was a large swinging crane wich lifted the aircraft from the water and onto trolleys on wich they could be tugged around. Hence it's surprising how many aircraft is to spot on dry land in this picture.
The BV 138 itself is a remarkable aircraft: The engines is two-stroke diesels and the lack of valves in the two-stroke engine is used to let 12 pistons operate against(!) each other in 6 cylinders by the use of two crankshaft - An opposite boxer-engine so to say.
The gain was the 'mileage' of the diesel, hence the 138 had a range of 4300km's :-o
The BV 138 dissapeared out of history and the only one to be exposed is one used as target during a post war RAF airshow, hence getting sunk in the waters east of Copenhagen and only to be found during excavation for the bridge spanning Öresund between Denmark and Sweden. It is however terrible corroded hence presented As a 'found at the seabed' -diorame at the Danish national tech museum in Helsingör (@Hamlets Elsinore). There is however several JUMO 205D engines to se around the world. Copenhageners have reported the remarkable seaplane to be extreme high pitched noisy, possible due to the neccesary ridgid sprocket connection of the two distant cranckshaft.
The engine did by the way find way into postwar Soviet and British tanks (If You Youtube the Chieftain tank You will experience the remarkable sound of the opposed six-cylinder twostroke!) and in an incredible triangonal configuration as the reknown Deltic engine for British postwar torpedoboats and later in diesel locomotives. Due to the calculation have the Deltic 3 cranckshaft; 18 cylinders and 36 pistons!

e7ypp2.jpg
Picture taken by Knud Sørensen at the day of liberation.

Edited by Armand, 03 April 2018 - 04:34 PM.

  • Heräkulman Ruhtinas likes this

#2 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

Heräkulman Ruhtinas

    Advanced Member

  • Regulars
  • PipPipPip
  • 363 posts
  • Joined 2 Years, 8 Months and 30 Days
  • 17 topics
  • LocationRiga, Latvia

Posted 03 April 2018 - 06:39 PM

Napier (of UK), which was anyway in to peculiar engine constructions, licenced the Jumo 205 before WW2 and managed to develop the Deltic, eventually. The Germans were working on similar layout, but they did not overcome the vibration issue (Napier put one of the 3 crankshafts to rotate in opposite direction, that solved the issue). Ironically, RN used a previous KM Schnellboot to clandestine missions in Baltic sea in late 40's , when its Maybachs wore out, they were replaced with more powerful Deltics.


  • Armand likes this

-<HR>-

Heräkulman Ruhtinas

Prince of Heräkulma

 


#3 Ricky

Ricky

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 3,022 posts
  • Joined 15 Years, 2 Months and 2 Days
  • 139 topics

Posted 04 April 2018 - 04:38 AM

I've seen a Cheiftain moving and don't remember a particularly unusual engine noise.

However I have stood on plenty of railway platforms while a deltic breezes past, and I can confirm they have a brain-piercing pitch

#4 Stony

Stony

    Regular Member

  • Regulars
  • PipPipPip
  • 289 posts
  • Joined 13 Years, 6 Months and 26 Days
  • 8 topics
  • LocationThe Right side of the Dutch/German Border

Posted 04 April 2018 - 05:22 AM

I've worked on 2-stroke diesel engines in a former career. Fun to fiddle with them but, they could have a temper. And we called them the screamers for the noise they made...

All Photo's are made by me unless stated otherwise. Re-use with full credit only.

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/stonyaviationpublishing/

http://stonyaviation.weebly.com/

http://aerialvisuals.ca/

 

Instagram: @stony_avpub


#5 Armand

Armand

    About the same age as another old Fokker: The F-27

  • Forum Guru
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,746 posts
  • Joined 4 Years, 3 Months and 1 Day
  • 117 topics
  • LocationAbout 20 nm east of BLL

Posted 05 April 2018 - 12:01 AM

I've seen a Cheiftain moving and don't remember a particularly unusual engine noise.pitch


https://m.youtube.co...h?v=ROOluJTSBbc
From 3:50 is first the ordinary V-12 of the Centurion to hear, and following the remarkable different sound of the Chieftain!

#6 Ricky

Ricky

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 3,022 posts
  • Joined 15 Years, 2 Months and 2 Days
  • 139 topics

Posted 05 April 2018 - 11:03 AM

Oddly not at all how I remember it sounding!

 

Some nice Deltic noises for comparison:

 


  • Armand likes this


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users