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Howdy from Che_Guevara


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#11 Armand

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 11:14 PM

Here was the original e-mail message I received 08/09/2013 from Mr. Hugh Chaney:.......
 I was surprised at the technical information about the B-29 props.  All I knew I  hated to push those blades through several times before boarding and starting the engines , never did ask why just Yes Sir git er done.


I'm surprised that the crew was such unaware of the tech around them, hence just crancked the engine by the prop without any idea why!
But now i can't help wonder wich tech details of the prop this was about :-/

I am disturbed by the "pilots sliding window" wich i cannot imagine at a prezzurized cockpit :-o

#12 DoubleT

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 12:57 AM

I'm surprised that the crew was such unaware of the tech around them, hence just crancked the engine by the prop without any idea why!
But now i can't help wonder wich tech details of the prop this was about :-/

I am disturbed by the "pilots sliding window" wich i cannot imagine at a prezzurized cockpit :-o

 

Armand:

The original 1/48 scale Monogram kit of the B-29 I built came with Curtis reversible electric props--with added cooling cuffs--that were used on the "Silverplate" B-29s. (ie. "Bock's Car" and "Enola Gay" nuclear bombers.) I explained to Hugh that to be accurate I needed to replace those as "Raz N' Hell" was equipped with the Hamilton Standard props built by the Frigidaire Division of General Motors. These were most commonly fitted props and photos of "Raz'N Hell" confirmed this to be true.

 

I imagine Hugh knew exactly why they were cranking the propellers before start-up. (He was double-rated pilot/bombardier.) As to the sliding window in a pressurized cockpit... I can only guess that it sealed VERY tightly at altitude!

--Tim


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#13 Ricky

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 07:32 AM

Welcome back Che, great to see you again :)
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#14 DoubleT

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 07:25 PM

Hello Ricky--'hope you've been well.

I'll be lurking in the background here from time to time...

--Tim


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#15 Skyraider87

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 09:04 PM

Hey RT and Ricky, thank you for the nice welcome, good to see you old friends too and being reminded of good memories :)

 

 

Che:

I don't think I ever shared the rest of the story of "Raz 'N Hell" with you. Some years after the thread here @ TGPlanes... I got an e-mail from Hugh "Lon" Chaney who told me he put many of the bomb stencils (missions flown) as bombardier of "Raz 'N Hell." He went so far as to send me a collection of photos and a sheet with captions that were simply incredible. He took in-flight photos from the nose station and showed raids in progress over North Korea. Shots of him dressed in all the gear ready for a combat mission... and more importantly how this particular B-29 got it's name.

It was one of a few aircraft modified to carry the "Razon" bomb-- an early radio-controlled bomb--and so the Raz 'N in it's name refers to it's origins with the Razon bomb. I have some correspondence/insights shared by Mr. Chaney... if I can find them in my e-mail folder, I'll post them up here.

--Tim

 

Hey Tim,

 

man, thats a real treasure! These old pictures connect us with the past. It brings this plane closer to being alive by seeing the pictures and by hearing the story behind the nose art. I havent heard much about the VB-3 Razon to be honest, I ve just had a quick read on wikipedia, but even this has been really interessting. Especially the special missions of B-29s attacking bridges in north korea. I ve learned something more. It seems that the efforts made in Korea are sometimes in the shadow of world war 2 and vietnam, but nevertheless its so interessting.

 

 

Especially this Email, thank you very much for sharing it Tim. It is quite sad to hear about the fate of Col. Payne Jennings and his crew. And again I was never aware of the Tarzon which is literally a mindblowing piece of engineering. Its really great to hear about the stories of the crew of RazĀ“n Hell, which brings this plane alive.

 

Regards,

Che


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