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Manufacturers with different types involved in WW2


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#11 curmudgeon

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 11:17 AM

What do you mean by 'type'?

 

Vickers/Supermarine produced numerous 'Spitfire' types - building about 20,000 of them, Vickers produced a few types of 'Wellington' plus others (manufacturing over 11,000 of them).

 

And a problem is that successful types will have long production runs



#12 Stony

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 01:47 PM

What do you mean by 'type'?

Vickers/Supermarine produced numerous 'Spitfire' types - building about 20,000 of them, Vickers produced a few types of 'Wellington' plus others (manufacturing over 11,000 of them).

And a problem is that successful types will have long production runs

The numerous marks of Spitfires are variants...not types. That counts for every basic design of airframe...

Edited by Stony, 01 January 2018 - 08:35 AM.

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#13 Ricky

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 02:42 PM

Do they have to have served with their home nation? A lot of obsolete types were in service with a variety of nations at the start of the war. Companies like Bristol or Curtiss would get a boost from these

#14 GregP

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 10:53 PM

I think he said manufacturers, and types, not variants.

 

Manufacturer is the maker, type is the series (Wildcat ... not F4F-3, F4F-4, etc.). For the Japanese, the series would be the A6M, not A6M2, A6M3, etc. Manufacturer would be Mitsubishi, but it was also built by Mitsubishi, Nagoya; Nakajima, Hikoki; and Hitachi, Kokuki, just as the B-17 was built by Boeing, Vega, and Douglas Long Beach.

 

So, I'm thinking he means ORIGINAL design and manufacturer and the Zero would be by Mitsubishi.

 

Could be wrong here ...



#15 Rick65

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Posted 01 January 2018 - 02:20 AM

I hope all had a great Christmas and New Year and thanks to all that have responded to the thread, especially Corsning who simplified my list.

My use of "type" was meant to mean an individual design. Developments of this design I would describe as "variants" eg the Spitfire V was a variant of the Spitfire type. This language becomes tenuous when a plane type is so heavily redesigned as to almost be a new design eg later model Griffon Spitfires with the new wing or the P-51H. The post war Avro Lincoln was originally called the Lancaster IV but was renamed when it was clear that it was actually a different type.

In terms of service I don't care who the planes served with, they had to be involved in some military role WW2 or the precurser wars including those in Spain, China and Manchuria. This involvement doesn't have to involve combat so trainers, transports and obsolete types used in these roles are OK.



#16 Rick65

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 11:53 PM

Re the offer of Curtiss No maybe for the SBC. Nathan Milarta has just posted the following in WIX FB "Did you know the Curtiss SBC Helldiver served in the Pacific up until 1943? Based at Somoa in the South Pacific. It was an observation squadron VMO-151 flew the SBCs on patrol until mid 1943. Pretty cool!"




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