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Observed aerial combat yesterday


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#1 Romantic Technofreak

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 06:20 AM

I was not aware that swifts even take on the peregrine falcon in mid air (a species that uses to chase them). I knew they do this against the sparrowhawk, but they are too fast, and the latter turns too tight for them.

 

I mean they should not mess with the hobby falcon. Once I saw one attacking a swallow from below (calculating the former's flight direction, coming close, then turning itself on the back and trying to grab the prey with its talons), and on another occasion attacking a swift head-on! Both efforts unsuccessfull, examples only to demonstrate the arrogance of this bird.

 

Regards, RT



#2 Stony

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 07:58 AM

We used to have a Peregine in the neighbourhood. And it decimated the pigeon population within weeks... Leaving the carcasses and feathers in the backgardens... Wich resulted in "gifts" from our cats in the form of half eaten pigeon corpses :) (our cats were to stupid to catch their own..)

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#3 Armand

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 01:33 AM

I've experienced a sparrow or pigeon -hawk around in the neighbourhood. One morning I woke up to the death-cry of a pigeon nailed to the lawn with the Hawk atop and at two occations have I been surprised by it's speedy flight in shoulder height in my driveway :-o
Denmark isn't bigger than all the country are to consider coastal and in the later years have gulls invaded the urban life. I wonder why evolution haven't evolved a gull-hawk as it certainly could be needed and there is quite a foodscource for it :-o
My personal best combat-like bird-experience have been few occations of flying ants exodus in my garden: Gulls behave irrationel rather high in the air have been the sign of the exodus and sitting in a garden chair can the level divided hunt for the surplus insects be percieved:
From sparrows hopping around picking the ants from the ground and occational jump a few wingstrokes to follow one in flight, to swallows rapid turns and abruptly stops in mid air in height lower than the apple tree, and swifts making speedy passes below rooftop height with the beak widely opened like a whale on hunt for krill!

Edited by Armand, 16 June 2017 - 01:36 AM.


#4 Kutscha

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 12:45 PM

I live a 1000mi from the sea and seagulls poop on my car all the time. Must be using that pickle barrel bomb sight of the Americans.


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#5 Ricky

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 04:40 PM

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#6 curmudgeon

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 09:01 AM

Sigh ... high speed video shows dragonflies nail their prey in over 95% of intercepts, even when the prey attempts terminal evasion. And in cases of a miss the same videotapes show the dragonfly doing a180 degree tumble and getting a second pass ...



#7 Armand

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 12:53 AM

Sigh ... high speed video shows dragonflies nail their prey in over 95% of intercepts, even when the prey attempts terminal evasion. And in cases of a miss the same videotapes show the dragonfly doing a180 degree tumble and getting a second pass ...


Wasps likely feed on insects caught in the flight - Ive always found this an amazing thought!

#8 Romantic Technofreak

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 09:16 AM

Some other, older observations (the first one not mine, was reported to me):

 

We have a kind of gull-hawk here, amazingly it is the buzzard. Because we have quite a couple of artificial lakes and carp-breeding ponds in the region, we also have some big inland colonies of black-headed gulls here. The gulls breed altogether in thousands, and the buzzard just dives into them and gets a bird - the other gulls don't react!

 

Once I have seen a peregrine falcon chasing a hawk (with some phantasy it looked like a Me 410 chasing a Do 217), making a lot of noise either (I love to see peregrine falcons, but I hate to hear them - their sound is really embarrassing). The hawk had no other chance than to perform a Split-S maneuvre and to dive into the treetops.

 

A nicely coloured bird that uses to live here on river banks is the grey wagtail (contrary to its name, its beauty is caused by yellow and black patterns). With its long tail and short wings, the wagtail is not the best flyer. So I mean it was a case of hubris by the wagtail to go into a dogfight with a little blue dragonfly, trying to catch it in mid-air. The outcome was clear.

 

Sometimes I see air battles between crows and buzzards - with the crows being the attacker, trying to chase off the predator (the latter could apologize "being only on an observation mission" and deny any try of provocation).

 

Regards, RT



#9 Armand

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 10:55 AM

.

A nicely coloured bird that uses to live here on river banks is the grey wagtail (contrary to its name, its beauty is caused by yellow and black patterns). With its long tail and short wings, the wagtail is not the best flyer. So I mean it was a case of hubris by the wagtail to go into a dogfight with a little blue dragonfly, trying to catch it in mid-air. The outcome was clear.

Our local white wagtail was originally a cattle-bird wich caught the insects aired by the cattles movement, hence 'jump (a few wingstrokes) and snap' hunt. This might be the feeding trick for any wagtail :-/ However dragon flies might be impossible prey.
 

Sometimes I see air battles between crows and buzzards - with the crows being the attacker, trying to chase off the predator (the latter could apologize "being only on an observation mission" and deny any try of provocation).
, RT

Crows are marvelous flyers, beeing able to perform regular aircraft show-manouvres such as rolls and Immelmanns, especially during courting the female in the spring!

I once observed blackbirds harrassing (and warning other birds of) a buzzard across township, where the blackbirds took the job at shift-work as the buzzard passed next blackbirds territory hence constantly being yelled of by two blackbirds in air!


Edited by Romantic Technofreak, 18 June 2017 - 05:32 PM.


#10 Romantic Technofreak

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 05:42 PM

I once observed blackbirds harrassing (and warning other birds of) a buzzard across township, where the blackbirds took the job at shift-work as the buzzard passed next blackbirds territory hence constantly being yelled of by two blackbirds in air!

:D

 

 

Instructions for bee/wasp students:

 

1) No trouble, go ahead!

3964643136343136.jpg

 

2) Terrible danger! Turn by 180 degrees and flee at top speed!

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Regards, RT






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