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Britains V bombers


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#1 TheArtOfFlight

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 02:16 AM

The V Bomber Force was the nickname given to Britain’s three bombers during theCold War that were capable of delivering nuclear bombs and formed part of Britain’s nuclear deterrent. The V Bomber Force was made up of the Vickers Valiant, the Avro Vulcan and the Handley Page Victor. The development of three bombers during the Cold War by the British was done to give the government increased freedom from US foreign policy. While the British government supported America during the Cold War, the V Bomber force gave it independence from the country that dominated NATO. As an example, the Valiant was used in the Suez Crisis of 1956 when America would not give any support to Anthony Eden’s government. If the British governments of the time had fully relied on America to provide bomber support, this would not have occurred. The same can be said for the use of the Vulcan during the Falklands War.

 

The V bombers were the wests front line Nuclear strike force. Carrying the British Nuclear "Blue Steel" warheads the V bombers were constantly on alert and could be scrambled and airborne within less than 90 seconds. Had the cold war turned hot the V force would have been the first aircraft to drop Nuclear weapons over a populated area in the east.

 

Handley Page Victor.

6859ddb9da3ff9d5bfac7b7138e0246d.jpg

 

Avro Vulcan.

f177dcc9e80705ae11471666ee18e78e.jpg

 

 

Vickers Valiant.

valiant-detail2.jpg

While i admit jet powered aircraft are not my favourite there has always been something so awe inspiring about these aircraft even though aside from the actual design which was very advanced, the technology on board was rather primitive. Still, these birds remain as special to me now as when the first time i ever laid eyes on them. Im just thankful they were never actually deployed on a real Nuclear mission.


Edited by TheArtOfFlight, 20 January 2017 - 02:21 AM.

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#2 GregP

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 09:08 AM

Loved 'em all. Great planes.

 

VERY interesting that the Victor survived longer in active service, to me. I would have bet the Vulcan early in the lives of both.

 

Victor introduction was Apr 58 and Vulcan introduction was Jul 56, and the Vulcan was the more "loved" of the two. But the Victor survived some nine years longer than the Vulcan in active service as a tanker. I would have thought the Vulcan could have held more fuel but maybe not, You never know at the start, do you?


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#3 TheArtOfFlight

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 12:15 PM

Loved 'em both. Great planes.

 

VERY interesting that the Victor survived longer in active service, to me. I would have bet the Vulcan early in the lives of both.

 

Victor introduction was Apr 58 and Vulcan introduction was Jul 56, and the Vulcan was the more "loved" of the two. But the Victor survived some nine years longer than the Vulcan in active service as a tanker. I would have thought the Vulcan could have held more fuel but maybe not, You never know at the start, do you?

I couldnt agree more. My personal favorite was the Vulcan too, that delta wing shape just made the whole aircraft look so distinctive. But you are right the Victor did last longer when it found its second role as a fuel tanker. I take nothing away from the Victor though, it too was such a unique and admired design. It just looks like it means business. Plus during the Falklands war (Operation Black Buck) the mission to fly from England all the way to the runway at Port Stanley was a very risky and daring raid considering by then the Vulcan was pretty much obsolete and about to be scrapped. I believe something like 5 -6 Victors had to escort one/two lone Vulcans all the way to the target and refuel it 4 or 5 times in relays just to get there. One bomb landed on the runway and some would argue it was a pointless effort. But very much like the B-25 raid on Japan by the US in ww2 it was more of a moral/psychological gain than a military success. Either way the Argentine airforce abandoned the runway and moved back to the mainland to operate their airforce which i personally think was a good result. 



#4 curmudgeon

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 12:15 PM

I think Victors could carry 39000lb internally whereas the Vulcan could carry 21000lb



#5 Kutscha

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 12:51 PM

Vulcan

Fuel capacity (main) 9,280 gal (74,240 lb avtur)

 

Wiki



#6 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 03:34 PM

Vulcan 607 by Rowland White is a good read...

 

The "Black Buck" -missions were a masterpiece of logistics http://www.raf.mod.u...onBlackBuck.cfm

https://theaviationi...-falklands-war/

 

http://www.operationblackbuck.com/


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#7 GregP

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 06:23 AM

I look at the V-Bombers and like them all, including the Valiant.

 

hitchwp201a.jpg

 

They built 107 Valiants, 136 Vulcans, and 86 Victors. The Victor retired in 1993, the Vulcan in 1984, and the Valiant in 1965. 

 

So the plane they built the fewest of lasted the longest. Somehow, that doesn't make sense to me, but it worled out like that.

 

You can't make this stuff up!



#8 Ricky

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 08:20 AM

Quantity vs Quality, I suppose.

Any idea how the costs compare?

#9 Stony

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 10:23 AM

I sure do like those V-Bombers!
I was lucky enough to see the Victor and Vulcan fly. Both very impressive!! Sadly the last flying Vulcan was grounded in 2015.

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#10 Armand

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 10:48 PM

[deleted]

Edited by Armand, 21 January 2017 - 10:53 PM.





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