Jump to content

  • Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Steam Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Photo
- - - - -

Allied aircraft & Their nicknames, what is the truth?


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#11 GregP

GregP

    Forum Guru

  • Forum Guru
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,211 posts
  • Joined 13 Years, 8 Months and 22 Days
  • 222 topics

Posted 09 January 2017 - 04:19 AM

There were basically 2 versions of the Helldiver ... the early one and the later one. The earliy one was less than wonderful, but the later version became a pretty good and reliable airplane.

 

But by then, the name had been coined and it stuck.



#12 TheArtOfFlight

TheArtOfFlight

    Advanced Member

  • Regulars
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Joined 4 Months and 27 Days
  • 5 topics
  • LocationUK

Posted 10 January 2017 - 04:58 AM

I believe the "wispering" part of the Beaufighter's nickname was related to the Bristol Hercules and its exhaust manifolding.

 

The sleeve valve engine was generally quieter than poppet valve engines and the exhaust manifolding would have quietened the sound even further compared to ejector exhausts.

 

http://447.insidetra...m-2008-0922.jpg

 

As to the Mustang whistling, I believe this is to do with the Rolls-Royce Merlin primarily, and can be also heard on Spitfires.

My only problem with the Beau or any other aircraft during ww2 is a piston engine (sleeve valve or not) still so quiet that it is proclaimed to be almost silent.....hence the nickname. Surely no aircraft, especially a twin engine/fighter bomber/attack aircraft could literally sneak up totally unheard until it was overhead of the enemy. Even if the enemy truly couldnt hear it until the last second they wouldnt be foolish enough to march/move around with their heads down. I found the whole thing rather odd/impossible to sustain a constant surprise factor and lean towards the propaganda explanation. Infact i did hear it was a British reporter who was responsible for thinking up the idea/name simply to try to scare the Japanese. 

 

Thank you for your input.  Much appreciated sir.



#13 TheArtOfFlight

TheArtOfFlight

    Advanced Member

  • Regulars
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Joined 4 Months and 27 Days
  • 5 topics
  • LocationUK

Posted 10 January 2017 - 05:04 AM

Thank you to everyone for the input. I  feel a lot more confident there isnt much validity in these odd ww2 nicknames. I think it was just a case of simple propaganda. 



#14 Wuzak

Wuzak

    Forum Guru

  • Forum Guru
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,935 posts
  • Joined 12 Years and 22 Days
  • 159 topics

Posted 10 January 2017 - 05:33 AM

My only problem with the Beau or any other aircraft during ww2 is a piston engine (sleeve valve or not) still so quiet that it is proclaimed to be almost silent.....hence the nickname.


I don't think that anybody is claiming the Beaufighter is almost silent, rather that it was much quieter than similar aircraft equipped with different engines, such as the Merlin.


  • TheArtOfFlight likes this

#15 TheArtOfFlight

TheArtOfFlight

    Advanced Member

  • Regulars
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Joined 4 Months and 27 Days
  • 5 topics
  • LocationUK

Posted 10 January 2017 - 12:24 PM

I don't think that anybody is claiming the Beaufighter is almost silent, rather that it was much quieter than similar aircraft equipped with different engines, such as the Merlin

 

Agreed i understand that. Im not trying to argue a point just simply find it strange no matter how quiet a piston engine aircraft might be, (having worked and been around aviation technology past and present) i find it very hard to believe any ww2 aircraft could not be heard approaching not only on its bombing/attack run, but most likely it would be heard from a good distance. Aircraft engines of the period are notoriously distinctive when it comes to sound. Have a good day sir.



#16 Ricky

Ricky

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 2,958 posts
  • Joined 14 Years, 3 Months and 5 Days
  • 138 topics

Posted 10 January 2017 - 05:36 PM

I suppose it is a form of stealth - the closer you can get the better. Or the worse from the target's point of view.

The other point is that with a quieter sound you can be there and dropping bombs while the troops still think you are a way off.
  • TheArtOfFlight likes this

#17 Ricky

Ricky

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 2,958 posts
  • Joined 14 Years, 3 Months and 5 Days
  • 138 topics

Posted 10 January 2017 - 05:41 PM

One nickname I have seen much debate over is 'Jug' and/or 'Juggernaut' for the P-47. I remember an article in a magazine (if only I could remember which one) claiming that it was a post-war nickname
  • TheArtOfFlight likes this

#18 CORSNING

CORSNING

    Forum Guru

  • Forum Guru
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,456 posts
  • Joined 3 Years, 10 Months and 3 Days
  • 175 topics
  • LocationClyde, Ohio, USA

Posted 10 January 2017 - 10:49 PM

From all that I have read to date (and then making a fairly intelligent decision :unsure:  :rolleyes: ), the

nickname 'Jug' came during WW2. 'Jug' was in reference to an oversized whiskey jug. When

it arrived in England the British mistook the nickname as short for juggernaut because of the

aircrafts ability to blast through telephone polls, trees and almost anything else that got in its

way. :)



#19 Wuzak

Wuzak

    Forum Guru

  • Forum Guru
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,935 posts
  • Joined 12 Years and 22 Days
  • 159 topics

Posted 10 January 2017 - 10:59 PM

I suppose it is a form of stealth - the closer you can get the better. Or the worse from the target's point of view.

The other point is that with a quieter sound you can be there and dropping bombs while the troops still think you are a way off.

 

Exactly that.

 

A quieter aircraft would be closer before its sound is detected by ground observers. the sound pressure falling in inverse proportion to the distance.



#20 TheArtOfFlight

TheArtOfFlight

    Advanced Member

  • Regulars
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Joined 4 Months and 27 Days
  • 5 topics
  • LocationUK

Posted 12 January 2017 - 11:38 AM

I was always under the impression "the jug" was a reference to an american milk jug. I have heard many accounts of how if stood on its nose the P-47 resembled a milk jug profile. Although personally i have never been able to see it. Recognize the profile/reference. Now im hearing it was a whiskey jug (thats a new one for me) but again i fail to see the likeness. I would be more inclined to believe in the Juggernaut reference as the P-47 was a very sturdy aircraft that was capable of sustaining huge battle damage and continuing to fly (get pilots home) A perfect example of this is Robert S Johnson in one of his first combat missions was heavily attacked by Fw 190s that almost shredded his P-47 and was then intercepted by German ace Egon Mayer who apparently used up all his ammo trying to bring down Johnsons Jug. Im sure everyone here knows or has heard of this famous aerial combat. Although there are quite a few conflicting accounts. One thing is certain, the P-47 was a very very well built and rugged aircraft perfectly capable of dogfighting even though i believe it was designed as a high altitude bomber destroyer. I think a lot of credit goes to one of the best radial engines to come out of ww2. The Pratt & Whitney R2800. 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users