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CURTISS HAWK 75 / P-36 TIMELINE


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#11 CORSNING

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Posted 10 December 2016 - 10:11 PM

                                                                   Hawk 75A-6 / H75A-6

 

August 1939: The Norwegian Army Service ordered twelve Hawk 75A-6s and obtained

     a license to build twenty-four more. A second order for twelve Hawk 75A-6s was

     placed soon after. They realized that Norwegian production could not meet the 1 July

     1940 deadline for 24 aircraft that they had set.

 

February 1940: Deliveries of H75A-6s began to Norway.

 

9 April 1940: Twelve H75A-6s had been delivered when Germany invaded Norway. Four

     had been assembled with landing gear (wheels) that was unfit for the end of winter

     weather and their guns had not been calibrated. These were destroyed on the ground

     by German bombers. The eight that were still in crates were confiscated by the Germans

     and later sold to Finland. 

 

October 1940: Germany agrees to sell captured Hawk 75s to Finland. Captured H75As were

     transported to Wuppertal where they were overhauled by the Espenlaub Flugzeugbau

     (Espenlaub aircraft construction). They were fitted with German instrumentation, a Revi

     C12/C reflector sight and FuG 7a radio.

 

Spring 1941: Germany began supplying Finland with fourteen H75A-3s plus seven H75A-4s

     which they had found at the SNCAC assembly plant at Bourges and eight H75A-6s which

     they had found in a warehouse still in their shipping crates at Oslo Harbour.

 

Note: The Hawk 75As were well liked and called Sussu (sweetheart) in Finish service.

 

25 June 1941: Finland resumed hostilities with the Soviet Union.

 

Early 1943: Germany sold twelve H75A-2s and H75A-3s to Finland.

 

5 January 1943: Germany sold the last three Hawk 75s to Finland.

 

Note: Finish Hawk 75As were credited with 190 1/3 kills. 24 out of 44 Hawks had been lost: 

     8 in aerial combat, 6 by anti-aircraft guns, 1 by enemy bombing and 9 from accidents.

     The Hawks remained in Finish service until 1948.


Edited by CORSNING, 24 December 2016 - 03:34 PM.

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#12 CORSNING

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 02:29 PM

                                                        Hawk 75A-7 / H75A-7

 

May 1940: The Dutch government had previously ordered 35 Cyclone-powered Hawk 75As

     for the LVA Luchtvaartafdeling (Royal Netherlands Army's Air Division. Criticism in the

     House of Representatives reduced this order to 20 aircraft. These were designated

     Hawk 75A-7s.

 

10 May 1940: Deliveries had not started when Germany began the invasion of the Netherlands.

     The twenty H75A-7s were diverted to the Netherlands East Indies.

 

Late 1940: All H75A-7s had been incorporated into the KNIL Luchtvaartafdeling (the Air

     Division of the Royal Netherlands Indies Army). These aircraft had the Wright GR-1820-

     G205A, 1 x 12.7 mm. + 1 x 7.7 mm. in cowl and 2 x 7.7 mm. in the wings.

 

Note: Because of ammunition difficulties the 12.7 mm. cowl gun was replaced by a 7.7 mm.

 

8 December 1941: The Wright Cyclone GR-1820-G205A had proven to be a very troublesome

     engine wherever it was operated. In inverted flight & during a dive the oil tended to drain

     away which would result in the engine seizing up. The Dutch installed a double bypass

     valve in the oil feed system. This helped but was not the total answer for the problem. They

     were still attempting to correct this problem when the Japanese invaded.

 

5 February 1942: The last two serviceable Hawk 75A-7s were destroyed by escorting fighters

     when they attempted to intercept a Japanese bomber formation.


Edited by CORSNING, 11 December 2016 - 06:51 PM.


#13 CORSNING

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 06:40 PM

                                                 Hawk 75A-8 / H75A-8

 

January 1940: The Norwegian Army Flying Service ordered thirty-six Hawk 75A-8s. These

     were powered by the Wright GR-1830-G205A Cyclone. Armament was 2 x 12.7 mm.

     upper cowl guns and 4 x 7.7 mm. wing guns.

 

9 April 1940: With the invasion of Norway the contracted Hawk 75A-8s were to be diverted

     to the soon to be Norwegian "Little Norway" flying training center at Island Airport,

     Toronto, Canada.

 

Summer 1940: The first of thirty-six H75A-8s began to arrive in Canada and to be used as

     advanced trainers. 

 

5 May 1943: The USAAF purchased 18 H75A-8s from the Norwegian flight training center.

     These were refurbished as P-36Gs and given USAAF serial numbers 42-36305 to 42-

     36322. These were then supplied under Lend-Lease to the Guerpo de Aeronautica del

     Peru (Body of Aeronautics of Peru) and served with the Escuadron de Caza

     (Squadron of Hunting).

 

29 May 1943: The USAAF purchases the last 12 remaining H75A-8s from the Norwegian

     training center after it had transferred from Toronto to Muskoka. These also became

     refurbished P-36Gs and given USAAF serial numbers 42-108995 to 42-109006. Ten

     of these were delivered to Peru.

 

 


Edited by CORSNING, 11 December 2016 - 06:51 PM.


#14 CORSNING

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 06:50 PM

                                                     Hawk 75A-9 / H75A-9

 

Late 1940: The Imperial Iranian Air Force placed an order for ten Hawk 75A-9s. These

     were Cyclone powered and armed with 6 x 7.62 mm. machine guns.

 

Summer 1941: Ten Hawk 75A-9s were delivered to Iran (Persia).

 

25 August 1941: British occupying forces found the Hawk 75A-9s still in their shipping

    crates and transported them to a maintenance unit at Drigh Road, Karachi.

 

Early 1942: All Hawk 75A-9s were issued to No.5 Squadron RAF in the Far East.

 

Continued in RAF Mohawks.


Edited by CORSNING, 11 December 2016 - 08:25 PM.


#15 CORSNING

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 07:38 PM

                                                        R.A.F. Mohawks

 

22 June 1940: The first of over 200 Hawk 75A-4s began to arrive at British ports along

     with twelve Hawk 75A-6s. A few Hawk 75A-1, A-2 and A-3s were flown across the

     Channel by French pilots. The following designation changes were made in the RAF:

     H75A-1 became Mohawk I

     H75A-2 became Mohawk II

     H75A-3 became Mohawk III

     H75A-4 and all subsequent Cyclone GR-1820 powered Hawk 75As became Mohawk

     IVs.

 

Early 1941: Hawk 75A-4s that were shipped to Britain from the USA had been refitted with

     6 x 0.303 in Browning machine guns, British throttle movement, gunsights,

     instrumentation and radios. They were at this time being dismantled and crated for

     shipment to South Africa.

 

May 1941: No.4 Squadron SAAF began working up on Mohawk IVs at Nakuru, Kenya.

     They later became operational in the Middle East with Tomahawks.

 

October 1941: No.5 Squadron SAAF began working up on Mohawks IVs (Hawk 75A-9)

     at Germiston.

 

15 January 1942: No.7 Squadron SAAF began flight training on Mohawks at Swartkop.

    

23 February 1942: No.6 Squadron began forming for home defense duties at

     Swartkop and Druan.

 

2 April 1942: No.7 Squadron passed its Mohawks on to No.6 Squadron which went

     operational from Groutville and Eeste River until late 1942.

 

October 1941: Twelve Mohawk IVs were delivered to Portugal after the Portuguese

     government invoked the Anglo-Portuguese Treaty of Military Alliance.

 

December 1941: Mohawk I, II, III & IVs that were being held at RAF maintenance

     units were shipped to India for the Indian Air Force.

 

17 June 1942: No.5 Squadron flew its first operational sortie with Mohawk IVs.

 

20 August 1942: No.5 Squadron claims its first kill.

 

1 April 1942: No.155 Squadron is formed at Peshawar. They receive Mohawk IVs

     in July and become operational in September.

 

Note: All Hawk 75As / H75As had problems with maneuverability and handling

     when all the fuel tanks were full.


Edited by CORSNING, 11 December 2016 - 08:01 PM.


#16 CORSNING

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 08:13 PM

REFERENCES:

War Planes of the Second World War, Fighters Vol. 4, 1961 by William Green

Profile Publications No.80, The Curtiss Hawk 75 by Peter M. Bowers. 

Air Enthusiast Vol.1 No.6 November 1971 & Vol.2 No..1 January 1972 by

     William Green and all.

Les Curtiss H75 de larmee del l'Air 2007 Lionel Persyn

US Army Air Force Fighters Part 1 by William Green and Gordon Swanborough

Joe Baugher's excellent sight was used for guidance and inspiration.


Edited by CORSNING, 24 December 2016 - 03:25 PM.


#17 CORSNING

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 08:37 PM

I hope you all enjoy looking over this thread. It was meant to be a quick reference. :lol:  :rolleyes:

In a sense it is. You don't have to leaf through endless pages to find a certain model or

date. I had fun researching this aircraft. This thread along with the CURTISS HAWK 75 /

P-36 PERFORMANCE thread in this section rehashed old memories and helped me find

new information.

 

:) , Jeff






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