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#21 flying kiwi

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 01:36 AM

I've always thought that the RAF rejected the P-39 for the same reasons that the Soviets loved it - it was best low down and useless at altitude. The British wanted the first and the Soviets wanted the second. As far as I know, the Spits they got were the standard Vb. If they'd been sent the LFVb, their conclusions may have been different.


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#22 GregP

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 06:48 AM

Perhaps. They also might not have been as happy with the Spitfire's maintenance requirements. I wonder how Merlin spares for the USSR would have worked out, but have no real information with which to shed any light.

 

I have seen pilot reports that the P-39 was one of the very best at 10,000 feet and below (you wouldn't encouter that much in the ETO), but quickly fell behind above 14,000 feet. That was the exact envelope the Soviets were fighting in. I simply heard they also used them for ground attack, but have no proof of same ... just hearsay from former Soviet pilots. Perhaps they were so drilled in disinformation, they simply told me that with no real knowledge or maybe a deliberate lie. I don't know. What's worse, I don't much think it has any import to anything. The Soviet front was what it was and the outcome was as we know it. Other than that, we have very little hard data for anaysis that is useful.

 

In Korea, they claim to have shot down more F-86 Sabres than we ever sent over. I can go from there.



#23 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 06:05 PM

Wuzak, kiwi,

 

The P-400 was armed with the 20mm Hispano cannon because it was from British order (they had already the 20mm, wanted it for logistical reasons among other stuff). 

 

RAF considered to use the P-400, but when receiving the first ones, they needed 200 (!) changes (mandatory things like defogging the canopy, better water sealing, working radios etc...) before they could be accepted to squadron use, taking several months. Even after all the changes, the performance was not good enough to take another type of plane in use (they had already the Hurricane for the job) and after 2 sorties, they were not used anymore. 


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Heräkulman Ruhtinas

Prince of Heräkulma

 


#24 Armand

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 10:27 PM

#5:
Strategic bomber-crews.

Being at top of the Mutual Assured Destruction, the crews of the US strategic bomber fleet seemingly had the outmost nervewrecking and stressfull job of the US peacetime military: Flying daily to keep the bombers in air 24-hour to be an untouchable nuke-delieverant to consider for an enemy.
Today, as we can enjoy that there never became use of the continually readyness, one can consider the needless amount of stress laid on generations (literally) of crews.
However, presumably all of them found themselves in the most boring job: Meet-in as sceduled with a huge lunchbox and take off for a daily secret flight-pattern just for returning to the same airbase (the amount of airbases around the world wich accommodates the B-52 are quite low) at the end of the day. Furthermore flight levels where so high that there wasn't much joy by the panoratic view.
The job was Just as routinely as piloting the international commercial airliners, but way less posh nevertheless hence surrounded by much hush-hush :-o

A close freind of mine is employed in an international corporation and told me this story:
At a point they were four different strangers in an airport waiting for delayed connection, who found out that they was heading for the same direction because they actually was colleagues, hence surrounded the same table and found need for introducing themselves:
The one was a former navigator of the B-52, put out of job by the introduction of GPS and downplayed the ears wide open impression of the others, by the story of boringness above.
BYW: Another of the four did almost the same with his prior occupation: Golddigger - Downplayed to geologist ;-)

Edited by Armand, 10 November 2016 - 07:45 PM.

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#25 Wuzak

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 12:01 AM

#5:
Strategic bomber-crews.

Being at top of the Mutual Assured Destruction, the crews of the US strategic bomber fleet seemingly had the outmost nervewrecking and stressfull job of the US peacetime military: Flying daily to keep the bombers in air 24-hour to be an untouchable nuke-delieverant to consider for an enemy.
Today, as we can enjoy that there never became use of the continually readyness, one can consider the needless amount of stress laid on generations (literally) of crews.
However, presumably all of them found themselves in the most boring job: Meet-in as sceduled with a huge lunchbox and take off for a daily secret flight-pattern just for returning to the same airbase (the amount of airbases around the world wich accommodates the B-52 are quite low) at the end of the day. Furthermore flight levels where so high that there wasn't much joy by the panoratic view.
The job was Just as routinely as piloting the international commercial airliners, but way less posh hence surrounded by much hush-hush :-o

 

A few of those crews had the excitement of dropping the bomb, albeit over US soil or the ocean and not quite deliberately (one may have deliberately dropped its bomb in unsuccessfully avoiding crashing into the sea).


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#26 Armand

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 07:48 PM

A few of those crews had the excitement of dropping the bomb, albeit over US soil or the ocean and not quite deliberately (one may have deliberately dropped its bomb in unsuccessfully avoiding crashing into the sea).


Being Danish I'm aware of the incident of a crashing B-52 at Thule airbase and the ever following debate of radioactive pollution of the area!

#27 Kutscha

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 09:38 PM

Lost Nuke found, maybe, https://www.theguard...d-cold-war-bomb



#28 Armand

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 05:37 PM

It surprises Me that no one have reacted at the sheer amount of .50 ammo in the Flying Fortress!
Try figure how much brass and lead was scattered over Germany during a massive bombing run :-o
Wich leads me to: Are there any Brits or German between US who have noticed tales of casings falling (hail-like) on the roofs/streets during airbattles above?

Edited by Armand, 11 November 2016 - 05:46 PM.


#29 CORSNING

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 07:58 PM

I believe in the case of the B-17s and B-24, they caught and reused all their shell casings.



#30 Wuzak

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Posted 12 November 2016 - 01:38 AM

It surprises Me that no one have reacted at the sheer amount of .50 ammo in the Flying Fortress!
Try figure how much brass and lead was scattered over Germany during a massive bombing run :-o
Wich leads me to: Are there any Brits or German between US who have noticed tales of casings falling (hail-like) on the roofs/streets during airbattles above?

 

I've always wondered about whether anybody was killed or injured from shells falling from an aerial battle.

 

I have seen that up to 50 people die each year in the US from bullets fired into the air (not sure how true this is). With the many thousands of bullets that missed targets in the air, some must have fallen on populations below?






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