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#181 Armand

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 12:13 AM

 
vesuvius_1944_3.jpg


Rear end downweighted by ash wich undoubtly was hot :-o

#182 Armand

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 12:41 AM

#51:
Speed, flightlevel and range was undoubtly the advantages of commercial jets vs. the (to be) last four-engined propeller aircraft.
However one of the forgotten gains of the 707 and DC-8 was that they managed transcontinental flights effortless where the four-prop's really stressed the engines to make the trip within the 8 hour the flightcrew was accepted in air by FAA then. Hence totally over shadowed the piston-engined at this crucial distance!

#183 Armand

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 01:21 AM

#52: Guns in aircraft.
The development of aircraft during the first world war really is impressive.
The average guy will have the battle between Sopwith Camel and the Fokker Dr.1 triplane in mind as representive for the period, but that was some of the last developed aircraft of the period.
As aircraft wasn't fighters at all at the start of the conflict and airfights did only escalate from the point where the first pilot took a pistol shot against an opponent, but the ability to take load had to evolve before machineguns could be brought with into the skies: First British try caused the aircraft only to climb to 1000ft in half an hour :-o
It is spoken that use of parachute was ignored due to a codex of knighthood, but the truth is more likely that the early aircraft couldn't lift the added weight of a parachute - And later when this became possible was the parachute traded for a machinegun and later yet another, and a backseat gunner, and ....
And all this just through a four year period!

#184 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 04:57 PM

#53: Japanese Naval Aviator parachutes

It is often heard that japanese did not have parachutes in their planes. On the contrary, it was against the regulations and punishable offence NOT to wear parachute when flying. Some "aces" though (like Sakai) did not use it in early war, because they did not like the extra weight and felt that the harness was hindering their movement and performance. It was enforced more later in the war.

 

And in case you wonder, kamikaze pilots wore parachutes too, they were not supposed to waste their lives due engine trouble.


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Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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