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#101 Rick65

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 03:14 AM

One in three?

At the time that V.M Yeates transitioned to Camels he had 12 hours of dual and 40 hours of solo training (thanks Kutscha) yet still experiences the troubles described, coming very close to becoming the "one" several times.

In 1918 the altitude challenged Camel seemed to be used a lot for ground attack and Yeates describes being far more scared of this than any air combat. In aerial duels he could use the advantages of a well flown Camel to evade and press attacks but in low level ground attack there was no escaping the element of luck.



#102 Armand

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 09:42 AM

One in three?


Taken from Your epos:
"They were bringing out a two-seater training Camel for dual work, in the hope of reducing that thirty per cent of crashes on first solo flights."

#103 Wuzak

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 12:03 PM

The A6M was also given the Allied code name 'Hamp' for awhile.

 

The official Allied code name was "Zeke", in keeping with the practice of giving male names to Japanese fighters, female names to bombers, bird names to gliders, and tree names to trainers. "Zeke" was part of the first batch of "hillbilly" code names assigned by Captain Frank T. McCoy of Nashville, Tennessee, (assigned to the Allied Technical Air Intelligence Unit (ATAIU) at Eagle Farm Airport in Australia), who wanted quick, distinctive, easy-to-remember names. When, in 1942, the Allied code for Japanese aircraft was introduced, he logically chose "Zeke" for the "Zero". Later, two variants of the fighter received their own code names: the Nakajima A6M2-N (floatplane version of the Zero) was called "Rufe" and the A6M3-32 variant was initially called "Hap". After objections from General "Hap" Arnold, commander of the USAAF, the name was changed to "Hamp". When captured examples were examined in New Guinea, it was realized it was a variant of the Zero and finally renamed "Zeke 32".'

 

https://en.wikipedia...i_A6M_Zero#Name



#104 Armand

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 10:11 PM

#23b:

The German V1 missile of WW2 was nicknamed 'buzz-bomb' because of the remarkable buzzing sound of it's pulse-jet engine.
Pulse-jets haven't seen much use since, however the modern ram-jet engine have been developed from the pulse-jet and paradoxically was the average use of ram-jets for a long time for the second stage of almost all SAM missiles across nations!
First stage is normally solid fuel rockets wich boosts the SAM quickly(*) into supersonic speed wich is needed for the function of the ram-jet, whereafter it sets in for travelling the missile to the target!
However modern SAM's have been developed for ever increasing speed, wich have caused the Ram Jet to be exchanged for 100% solid fuel rockets. The huge amount of russian produced SA-2's worldwide does still represent the tech though!
(*): Ram-jet SAM's passes the speed of sound about only two missile-lengths away on their travel, wich in praxis is just afront of the launcher :-o

Edited by Armand, 21 April 2017 - 07:40 PM.





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