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Umm...How Old the B-52?


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#11 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 18 September 2016 - 08:44 AM

Agree with DC-3

 

BTW I have not found any reference saying that Russian AF has retired their An-2's.

 

To add to this:

First flown in 1952, the Tu-95 entered service with the Soviet Union in 1956 and is expected to serve the Russian Air Force until at least 2040.


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#12 Armand

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Posted 18 September 2016 - 02:48 PM

- The oldest continuously serving military/commercial aircraft type that is still earning revenue? (not rare museum pieces flying at airshows- but a type in some sort of regular service).[/size]
 
Must be the DC-3, right?


I took note that DC-3 was used as a duster against Zika in Florida - Not quite museum-work ;-)

#13 Chino Kid

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Posted 20 September 2016 - 10:39 PM

Yes, it looks like the Tu-95 must be the winner of the longest continuous operational military aircraft. It's quite an amazing conglomeration of 1950s design with apparently 2016 ability. I would like to see what the Russians are doing to keep its engines running and its pilots flying.

Thank you, dear Prince!



#14 flying kiwi

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Posted 21 September 2016 - 12:36 AM

Yes, it looks like the Tu-95 must be the winner of the longest continuous operational military aircraft. It's quite an amazing conglomeration of 1950s design with apparently 2016 ability. I would like to see what the Russians are doing to keep its engines running and its pilots flying.

Thank you, dear Prince!

 

I suspect the maintenance people and pilots get their grandfathers to teach them, same as the B-52.



#15 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 24 September 2016 - 05:05 PM

Yes, it looks like the Tu-95 must be the winner of the longest continuous operational military aircraft. It's quite an amazing conglomeration of 1950s design with apparently 2016 ability. I would like to see what the Russians are doing to keep its engines running and its pilots flying.

Thank you, dear Prince!

 

If I remember right, these are starting more or less to be a maintenance nightmare (like it or not, the Soviet/Russian equipment is not exactly well known of ease of maintenance or longevity). In last 10 years they have been grounded for inspections at least twice:

 

https://theaviationi...nt-at-ukrainka/

https://sputniknews..../161979110.html

 

The Kuznetzov NK-12 engines have somewhat short time between overhauls, 200h. Interestingly, the NK-12 has its roots in Junkers Jumo 022 turboprop from Germany, the engineering team was "recruited" to design an engine to Soviets. 


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#16 Chino Kid

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Posted 02 October 2016 - 08:44 PM

I just read in a book about the design of the B-52 that one of Boeing's early proposals used four turboprop engines driving contra-rotating propellers. The USAF rejected it because the massive gearboxes would likely be a huge maintenance problem and hung their hopes on a design with nascent jet engines. Thus came the B-52. I think the US might still be flying something very close to the TU-95 had that decision not been made.



#17 Armand

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 09:25 PM

Yes, it looks like the Tu-95 must be the winner of the longest continuous operational military aircraft!


Following Heräkulmans answer above was the introduction of the B-52 actual one year prior to the Bear!

#18 Armand

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 09:27 PM

In the honour of the Bears longevity:
Attached File  IMG_3118.JPG   115.71KB   0 downloads
Attached File  IMG_3119.JPG   14.01KB   0 downloads

Edited by Armand, 10 October 2016 - 09:37 PM.


#19 Chino Kid

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 12:07 PM

Fascinating comparison, Armand. Here is the same F-106:

 

 F-106A-110-CO, 59-0033 of the 119 FIS, 177 FIG, New Jersey ANG, based at Atlantic City and seen at Luke AFB in June 1987. 






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