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Steel VS aluminium in the WW2 aircraft


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#21 Kutscha

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 03:18 PM

Has there been any sensible reason of creating the Albemarle?

 

Like the Mosquito, a hedge against a scarcity of aluminium, afaik.


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#22 Romantic Technofreak

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 05:29 PM

No documents survive because, obviously, they were used in the creation of the final prototype - a rather ambitious attempt to create an amphibious version...

Yes, that's very probable... ;)

 

The story of Pycrete comes to my mind!

The Pycrete fighter was a Canadian project following the Quebec Conference of 1943. It was designed for use in very cold circumstances as in a full-scale war in the arctic - what easily could have happened were the Canadian wilderness touched by Axis troops. An offer to Stalin was made for the similar circumstances in Northern Siberia, but nothing came of this before the war ended. After WWII had ended, such cooperation got forbidden by the rise of the Cold War - which turned out not to be cold enough for such a project.

 

Like the Mosquito, a hedge against a scarcity of aluminium, afaik.

Surely, Kutscha, but was there any real threat of bauxite shortage for Britain?

 

Regards, RT



#23 Kutscha

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 05:48 PM

If you were in charge RT would you like to take the chance there wouldn't be a shortage? All bauxite was imported and if the U-boats had been successful......

 

There was a shortage of aluminium in late war Germany > wooden tails of 109s and 190s. The Ta154 was mostly wood.



#24 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 06:41 PM

to the OT, there will still be a lot of steel parts in aircraft, engine, hinges, landing gear struts, weapons...

 

As for drop tanks, weren't they mainly made from plywood or paper mass anyway, as far as the German ones were so at least.


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#25 Armand

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 08:52 PM

One word about spelling mistakes: Every time now I see the word "aircrafts" it will loose the tail "s". B)
Regards, RT


Practically with such an editor to cover up ones failures!
BTW: Couldn't You edit my dreadfull mistake in the header of the Flying Tigers post:
"Six'n half months efford(!), 75 Years.............." ?
"efford" was so straight-out in my mind, however the right word: "achievement" have come to my mind since :-(

#26 Armand

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 10:21 PM

One word about spelling mistakes: Every time now I see the word "aircrafts" it will loose the tail "s". B)
 
Regards, RT


As it seems that You did: Didn't You create another mistake by leaving 'the' ?
Quote: "..... in THE WW2 aircraft"

#27 Romantic Technofreak

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Posted 04 July 2016 - 05:08 AM

Practically with such an editor to cover up ones failures!
BTW: Couldn't You edit my dreadfull mistake in the header of the Flying Tigers post:
"Six'n half months efford(!), 75 Years.............." ?
"efford" was so straight-out in my mind, however the right word: "achievement" have come to my mind since :-(

No Sir! :D

 

Because somebody already did it: http://www.warbirdsf...5-years-legacy/

 

 

As it seems that You did: Didn't You create another mistake by leaving 'the' ?
Quote: "..... in THE WW2 aircraft"

Sorry Sir, I don't understand... :( :huh:

Anyway, my ambition to correct mistakes does not mean I don't produce one ones, ahem, own ones.

 

 

If you were in charge RT would you like to take the chance there wouldn't be a shortage? All bauxite was imported and if the U-boats had been successful......

 

There was a shortage of aluminium in late war Germany > wooden tails of 109s and 190s. The Ta154 was mostly wood.

I am not too familiar with the U-boat war. As much as I mean to know, despite all the sinking successes Britain was never really endangered to suffer any real shortage. My question was, has there been at any time a predictable, production-hampering shortage of aluminium in Britain? Well, I know I can google for this myself, but if anybody knows something without googling, he could tell it to us.

 

Regards, RT



#28 flying kiwi

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Posted 04 July 2016 - 11:26 AM

The raw material, bauxite, came by sea. I don't know how close they came to running out, but they would have been worried.

Duralumin, the alloy used most in WW2 aircraft, was invented in Germany before WW1. It's an alloy of aluminium with copper, magnesium, and something else I can't remember. It is harder than aluminium, but not as resistant to corrosion. They used to use an outer layer of aluminium sometimes to prevent corrosion, the material then being known as alclad. The polished finish the Americans liked so much later in the war would have also helped to prevent corrosion.



#29 Mercman

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 09:44 AM

DH Mosquito being the one with responsibility of breaking the circle ;-)

 

Well, to be sure, the Mosquito - statistically - contributed far fewer items in the 'Merlins to Germany'

'export drive', - as was run for years by 'Butch' Harris, than the vulnerable 'heavies' ,

but still, each Mosquito did provide two Merlins, as opposed to a single unit 

that a PR Spit, or Mustang could supply...






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