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Introduction and Advice...

Plane wreck scuba Subic Bay Philippines aircraft Torpedo bomber WW2 Japanese

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#11 Armand

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 02:30 AM

Armand:  A Magnet... excellent idea, I will get back with the results on that after the next dive in a few days... Will also try to get a better view of what's left of the wing flaps.
Paul B

A simple tape-measurer for measuring sizes might likely be a good tool.
Anyhow, You miss giving any qualified guessos of sizes!

#12 Chino Kid

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 02:41 AM

I Know What You Found... Unfortunately not Japanese.

 

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Attached File  P-3 upside down.png   66.39KB   1 downloads

 

You have found the remains of a Lockheed P3A Orion that went into Subic Bay in 1971. Specifically the #1 or 4 Nacelle. No cockpit, no wheels. The wheels were in #2 and 3 nacelles.

 

See story here...including a picture of the salvaged remains- minus the nacelle you found!

 

Isn't the interweb wonderful! :)

From what I see, Subic offers wreckage exploration opportunities to last a lifetime. Best wishes and be careful out there.


  • CORSNING, Heräkulman Ruhtinas and Paul Birdseye like this

#13 Paul Birdseye

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 09:50 AM

Chino Kid; Why the heck didn't I think of that??? ... we (re)found the Orion's Tale upright in the sand a couple of years ago. Albeat a way's away from this piece. I should have thought of it but I was convinced it was a smaller plane... no wonder we can't see any wheels!   (Or Cockpit...!)   Looking with a fresh pair of eye's at this.  If there are points to be awarded you get them!  I will dive it again and seek to confirm your ideas on this...

 

Very Happy! 

 

Paul



#14 CORSNING

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 11:37 AM

Nice eye and nice catch Bruce.



#15 Armand

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 08:00 PM

I Know What You Found... Unfortunately not Japanese.
 
You have found the remains of a Lockheed P3A Orion that went into Subic Bay in 1971. Specifically the #1 or 4 Nacelle. No cockpit, no wheels. The wheels were in #2 and 3 nacelles.
 


However, the fuselage is mentioned hence it should be the #2 or 3 nacelle with a wheel :-/
Anyhow, The engine cowling for the turboprop should have a likevise notable exhaust-'scoop' at the rearmost!?

#16 Paul Birdseye

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Posted 02 July 2016 - 01:34 AM

Gentlemen.

For someone that's almost dyslexic when it comes to left and right, this comes hard to me but I'll try. :-). As I see it we are looking at the outer nacelle on the "right" wing from the pilots point of view. Correct?

I will make a new video presentation of the find and post the link here for anyone interested. I'll include the images as references for comparison.

A fat spat, an M3 halftrack (with a 75mm howitzer), a PBY Catalina wing, and now a major part of the Orion... I can't wait to see what Subic Bay throws at us next! Thanks again for the help...

One good thing about being totally wrong is that I studied everything I could find about japanese WW2 planes... I'm much better prepared for when I do "finally" find one... :-)

(I love my hobby can you tell?)

#17 Armand

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Posted 02 July 2016 - 12:41 PM

One good thing about being totally wrong is that I studied everything I could find about japanese WW2 planes... I'm much better prepared for when I do "finally" find one... :-)
(I love my hobby can you tell?)


As it often is seen: One interrest leads to another ;-)
I'm sure that most of Us in here have been lead to Our warbird interrest by some diversion of another interrest!

#18 Chino Kid

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Posted 02 July 2016 - 12:50 PM

Paul,

Yes you are correct.

See the bottom picture of my post above. The picture I turned upside down.

The landing light is inboard of the nacelle. That picture is the pilot's left wing, engine number one.

 

From what I can tell of your videos, the landing light socket is to the right of the remains of the nacelle as you face in the nacelle's forward direction.

If that's the case, it would have to be the pilot's right wing, and the number 4 nacelle.

 

If you face the nacelle's forward direction and the landing light socket is to the left of the remains of the nacelle, it would have to be the pilot's left wing and the number one nacelle.



#19 Armand

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Posted 02 July 2016 - 07:03 PM

Armand:  A Magnet... excellent idea,

Hold Your horses: As I've got second thoughts, I've asked the knowledgebank of Warbirdforum in another posting and the conclusion is that magnetic steel will be absolut rare in the main construction of aircraft! Hence the magneto trick aren't as useable as I thought :-(
However, it might still be practical to determine the normal steel-crafted items as axles, hydraulic stems and bolts/nuts thus maybee help understand wich item You might have at hand :-/





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Plane, wreck, scuba, Subic Bay, Philippines, aircraft, Torpedo bomber, WW2, Japanese

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