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Some Personal Pics from the Old Days

Planes of Fame museum restoration warbird

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#1 Chino Kid

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Posted 26 June 2016 - 04:44 PM

One regret I have today is that I didn't take many photographs during my years at Chino. More pictures would be nice...40 year old memories tend to fade...or get more and more embellished with time :)

Of course cameras were not ubiquitous as today, and getting pictures developed was a chore. But I went through a trunk of memorabilia in the basement this morning, and found an album with some photos I took. I will post them here a little at a time as time allows. I'm going to go through the album front to back so things will come up in no particular order. I don't know what the 500K limit will allow so I may have to resize them for the forum, but if any of you are interested in any in the original scan size maybe I can provide them directly.

 

This first tranche is from what must have been around 1976 or so. A company was filming a made-for-TV movie called "The Amazing Howard Hughes" starring a then little known actor called Tommy Lee Jones. My friend and consummate airport bum Al Redick was working for TallMantz Aviation at the time and they had the contract to provide the aircraft and flying scenes for the movie's rendition of Hughes filming "Hell's Angels". This was at Flabob airport outside of Riverside, Calif.

They needed some grunt work done on set (pushing planes around, minor servicing, etc.) and Al asked me if I wanted a couple days work. So the pictures are of a movie set of a movie set.

I met Frank Tallman at the end of the gig. I had replaced a cracked plexiglass windscreen on one of his biplanes after a ham-handed actor pushed down on it while climbing out of the cockpit. Mr. Tallman thanked me, shook my hand and tipped me a 20.

 

Attached File  Hughes1 (765 x 551).jpg   59.93KB   0 downloads   Attached File  Hughes2 (766 x 531).jpg   62.43KB   0 downloads  

 

Not quite sure what caught my eye in the next one :)

 

Attached File  Hughes3 (600 x 406).jpg   39.33KB   0 downloads  Attached File  Hughes4 (600 x 399).jpg   33.64KB   0 downloads

 

 


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#2 CORSNING

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Posted 26 June 2016 - 06:16 PM

Great old pictures. Thank you for sharing them Bruce.



#3 Armand

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Posted 26 June 2016 - 06:27 PM

One regret I have today is that I didn't take many photographs during my years at Chino. More pictures would be nice...40 year old memories tend to fade...or get more and more embellished with time :)
Of course cameras were not ubiquitous as today, and getting pictures developed was a chore.......


Dont regret. I dont think many more of todays extreme amount of digital pictures will survive the same timescale as our albums with paper-pictures :-/
I enjoy participating in a facebook-group covering classic stories and pictures of our local town. Though the town itself is relatively Young it's few documents before the occurence of the photography wich is able to publish, but the amount of pictures from the past 140 years is amazing and one can mourn that today wont be documented as thoroughly in 100 years from now!

To keep it topic: The volunteers group of the Elsinore tech museum have decided to build a Friedrichshafen f.f. 49 floatplane from scratch, helped by the original measurements by the navy (to licence build it). Two details are the propellant to the project: There isn't any example of the aircraft surviving worldwide, and after the f.f. 49 drifted from naval use to national mail-delivery (a huge step for the Island nation of Denmark!) it later became Denmarks first aircraft to transport passengers routinely.
Well into the building progress does the question of colorisation appear - And it shows that there is not any document wich tells the actual colorisation when turned over to civil aviation though it's less than 100 years ago: Several photos exist, but they are naturally in black and white and as posters are the only possible media with colors they would be subjects of sceptism as they are subject to the painter and printers own imagination :-(

#4 Chino Kid

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 05:34 PM

Here's the AT-12 shortly after being restored to flight worthy status.

 

Attached File  Seversky (600 x 413).jpg   45.09KB   0 downloads

 

The building we were in certainly wasn't what they have today! If you look very carefully at the bottom you can see a scissors jack holding up the column that supports the roof. They removed that column when the Museum moved into that building so they could take down the wall and make a door big enough to get the airplanes through! The column was replaced with the pole-jack setup so it could be removed. The roof didn't sag very much during the short times the pole was removed to move planes around :)



#5 Chino Kid

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 11:42 PM

Here are some more pics.

The Helldiver was static display only.

 

Attached File  Helldiver.jpg   29.66KB   0 downloads

 

The Delta Dagger came from the California Air National Guard when they retired them out of Ontario International Airport.

 

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As a much younger lad I started hanging around the Museum when it was at Ontario while my father and brother were involved. I recall that CANG base across the runway flew F-86Ds. They'd take off in pairs and really rattled the Museum hanger as it was quite close to the end of the runway. But the noise became deafening when they transitioned to the F-102s.

Years later when they retired the Daggers, they replaced them with....

 

...well just imagine an F-102 jock arriving one weekend only to find them all gone and instead have to get rated in...

 

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#6 Chino Kid

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Posted 29 June 2016 - 01:57 AM

Here is the B-17 we used to store excess fuel upon return from airshows. We'd get topped off with 115/145 (the military stuff was high grade!) at the many weekend airshows at nearby military bases like NAS Miramar, Travis AFB, Norton AFB and March Field. Full tanks of gas was payment for bringing warbirds for display at their open house. We'd line up the Mustang, Hellcat, SNJ and whatever else we took for the weekend and with a transfer pump and hose we'd pump the fuel into the wing tanks of the B-17. Lots of juice for later fun.

 

Attached File  B-17.jpg   33.96KB   0 downloads

 

Attached File  B-17-1.jpg   32.2KB   0 downloads

 

This aircraft was "Picadilly Lilly" that starred in the TV show "12 O'Clock High" which was filmed at Chino in the mid 1960s. Chino was an Air Corps training base during the war and when I was there there were still many of the old original buildings, hangars and adobe revetments.



#7 Chino Kid

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Posted 29 June 2016 - 11:00 AM

This B-25 was our second one restored to flight worthy status. It looks like a solid-nose attack version. But it was never used that way. It was actually a passenger version that was factory modified during the war for Gen. Eisenhower to use to shuttle around the European Theater. Inside were leather seats and a small office space. IIRC the upholstery was done in a tacky sort of old western motif ala Gene Autry with cattle and lariat embossing.

 

Attached File  B-25.jpg   29.28KB   0 downloads



#8 Chino Kid

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Posted 30 June 2016 - 12:17 PM

The compound to the west of the Museum was a fenced off area containing one of the old large hangars. That space was owned by a gentleman named Dave Tallichet.

He owned a bunch of aviation themed restaurants around Southern California at the time, and had a small crew of workers, mostly employed in making fiberglass replica airplanes for his restaurants. I don't believe I ever met the man, as he was kind of an absentee owner- but he was beginning to amass an impressive collection of aircraft of his own. This was not open to the public...he'd just haul in something new every now and then and there they all sat behind a barbed wire fence. He was not actively restoring anything, just collecting. I got in one day and took some snaps.

 

Attached File  B-26.jpg   33.32KB   1 downloads

 

Most of a Martin B-26. Quite rare as there were few that survived scrapping after the war. It was an unforgiving beast that saw no use after WWII with the U.S. or any allies that I know of. I am not aware of any non U.S. deployment of this type.

 

I stuck my head in the open bomb bay and snapped this looking toward the cockpit.

 

Attached File  B-26-1.jpg   31.65KB   0 downloads



#9 flying kiwi

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Posted 30 June 2016 - 09:12 PM

 

attachicon.gifB-26.jpg

 

Most of a Martin B-26. Quite rare as there were few that survived scrapping after the war. It was an unforgiving beast that saw no use after WWII with the U.S. or any allies that I know of. I am not aware of any non U.S. deployment of this type.

 

If you mean during the war, the RAF used them. Early on they were called the Widowmaker, but apparently their overall safety record was better than many aircraft. 

 

http://img.wp.scn.ru...pics/9_1_b2.jpg



#10 Chino Kid

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 01:03 AM

Ah...very good. Thank you.

I recall the saying from MacDill Field, a B-26 training base in Florida- "A plane a day in Tampa Bay".







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