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Finnish Air Force insignia

Finnish Swastika insignia von Rosen WW1 WW2

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#1 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 14 May 2016 - 05:35 PM

Armand asked me for a small write-up of the swastika (hakaristi/hakenkreuz/ugunskrusts). Using bit of google translate because I am lazy.

 

1298040535_600px-Finland_roundel_WW2_bor

 

Hakaristi is a millennia-old symbol of luck and happiness, which is used in a sign of luck in many cultures. The swastika is still present in many denominations of good or metaphor of eternal.
In Western countries, a swastika has, however, become known primarily with German National Socialists.
 
The swastika is well known in Finland and the Baltics on the basis of archaeological finds since the Iron Age. Later known as decorated with a variety of utensils and textiles. It has long been in use in the Nordic countries as a symbol of happiness. Textiles, which are often decorated with numerous different symbols, the swastika has also been appointed as "vääräpää".
 
In independent Finland the swastika as symbol is used for example: Lotta Svärd, the armed forces, the Finnish Nurses Association, Ilmari Kianto and the Rose Cross.
 
In addition, the swastika found in the Finnish White Rose, Grand Cross of the chain and can still be seen mm. Cross of Liberty marks of honor, the Presidential flags of the Republic, as well as the Air Force's various units.
 
1298040523_468px-Gallen-Kallela_sotalent
 
The establishment of the Finnish Air Force
 
Finnish Air Force was founded when Swedish Count Eric von Rosen donated in Vaasa 3.6.1918 one Thulin aircraft typ D (Swedish-built copy of the French Morane-Saulnier Parasol aircraft) to the White army of Finnish Civil War.
 
The plane was von Rosen's flight school plane, and previously on its wings, school IDs were replaced by von Rosen's personal fortune symbol, a blue swastika.
 
The blue swastika placed in a white circle emblem was ordered to use with military aircraft in March 1918. At the same time swastika became a symbol of armored vehicles of the army.
 
1298040547_600px-Finland_roundel_border.
 
Abandoning the honorable swastika
 
The use of the swastika was discontinued in Air Force machines and in the Finnish flight mark during the Lapland War in April 1945. This happened by the Allied Control Commission's request, because it was associated with the Second World War Nazi Germany symbol (how retarded is this?).
 
Also anti-aircraft troops and armored forces abandoned the swastika at the same time.
 
Then, in 1945, a round blue-white insignia was introduced.
 
1298040484_577px-Lentosotakoulu.svg.jpg
 
Revival of the swastika
 
1950 Air Force departments wanted their own flags. They were designed by Major Olavi Seeve, which later became a Lieutenant General and Commander of the Air Force (1958-1964).
President of the Republic Urho Kekkonen introduced the new flags in the Armed Forces Flag Day parade in Helsinki Senate Square 04/06/1958.
 
Blue-flag-based design is the same one that was already designed by Akseli Gallen-Kallela  as the old "war pilots sign". Thus the swastika had come back to the Finnish Air Force flag emblem.
 
 
The swastika today in Finland
 
The swastika is still used in flags of the Air Force and some unit flags and included in many honorary citation marks.
 
A number of cross-departmental flags is not "von Rosen" cross on blue, but black.
In Kauhava Air Force Academy flag there are three swastika instances: in the middle of the flag, the top left of the unit emblem in the middle and the end of the rod inside the Cross of Liberty.
 
If you are watching your surroundings in Finland and Baltic states, you can see the swastika emblem in ornamentation of many old public buildings: exterior doors, gates, staircases, etc.
 

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Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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#2 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 14 May 2016 - 05:42 PM

Original article http://www.karjalani...ikan)_historia/

 

Also would like to add that the origin of the German Reich swastika may also be from count von Rosen. Von Rosen was friends with Hermann Göring and Görings great love Carin was sister of von Rosen's wife. So there may be the connection that Göring "imported" the sign in Hitler's knowledge as insignia.

 

Eric von Rosen himself was impressed by the swastika while traveling as a young man in Gotland and seeing it in runestones.

 

Swastika (finnish: hakaristi; latvian: ugunskrusts) was also used as insignia of Latvian Air forces after Latvian independence and it is rather common sight here in Latvia.  


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#3 Armand

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 11:21 AM

Armand asked me ...

At a point i felt the need to refresh my mind with the Finnish swastika-story and felt afterwards that the fewest even might have my Scandinavian pre-perception of the pagan swastika-symbol, hence the story could deserve to be told. Since to see on several pictures, of Finnish aircrafts in this forum, it should not be off-topic here.
Based on Heräkulmans nationality I occationally urged(!) him to make a posting about the case and I find it well done!

Edited by Armand, 15 May 2016 - 05:49 PM.


#4 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 04:00 PM

Some addendum to the previous texts, should have referred the area to "Scandinavia, Finland and Baltic states".

 

Before WW2, Finland was counted to be one of the Baltic states and Scandinavia + Denmark again a different "political playground"


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#5 Armand

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 05:47 PM

I'll like to slide-in a Geografical lecture to non Scandinavians: In Scandinavia are Scandinavia considered Sweden; Norway and Denmark only, hence this countries are connected by languages being almost dialects of each other.
Internationally seen are the term wider, including Finland and Iceland - Wich regionally is named 'the Nordic countries' or shortly 'The North'.

#6 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 07:04 PM

I'll like to slide-in a Geografical lecture to non Scandinavians: In Scandinavia are Scandinavia considered Sweden; Norway and Denmark only, hence this countries are connected by languages being almost dialects of each other.
Internationally seen are the term wider, including Finland and Iceland - Wich regionally is named 'the Nordic countries' or shortly 'The North'.

What I have been told it is:

Scandinavia, as Scandinavian peninsula is Sweden+Norway. Maybe in political sense Denmark is included.

Fennoscandia is Scandinavia + Finland (maybe post-ww2 term?)

Nordic countries is geopolitical term which includes Finland, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden and Norway (+ Färöes, Spitsbergen and such) consisting of countries with alleged similar cultural ties. (that may mean countries been invaded, occupied or been part of Sweden?  :D but then, it should include northern Germany, Baltics, Poland and Russia...may come to surprise for some ppl that actually Sweden has been rather aggressive country in history!)


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#7 Armand

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 09:50 PM

Becoming a major geografical lesson:
Reading on the subject: The naming Scandinavia supposedly comes from the romans and covered 20 (Danish) isles including the really big one wich later showed to be the Swedish/Norvegian peninsula.
Though kind of obvious the Finnish connection with the Baltics is a lesson to Me! I guess that the inclosed USSR caused the Finnish bond to the now known Baltics to be broken :-/
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#8 Ricky

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 10:55 AM

The use of the swastika was discontinued in Air Force machines and in the Finnish flight mark during the Lapland War in April 1945. This happened by the Allied Control Commission's request, because it was associated with the Second World War Nazi Germany symbol (how retarded is this?).


Not very. Quite sensible both in terms of misidentification and also the general bad feeling engendered by the Nazis. I would think it a prudent move for a small nation trying to survive next to the Soviet Union in 1945.


As to Scandinavia, I would have said it was Norway/Sweden/Denmark (ie where the Vikings came from ;) ). Finland is geographically attached, but kind of different.

#9 Armand

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 11:49 AM

[[The use of the swastika was discontinued in Air Force machines and in the Finnish flight markongs...This happened by the Allied Control Commission's request, because it was associated with the Second World War Nazi Germany symbol (how retarded is this?).]]

Not very. Quite sensible both in terms of misidentification and also the general bad feeling engendered by the Nazis.

Retarded might be a bad chosen word, I find narrow minded more suitable.
The Swastika originates from Scandinavia and the Baltics and was in modern time introduced to the Nazi's after the Finns had adapted it - And You dont find it narrow minded(!) to expect a third country to drop the use of the Swastika because of the political use during (just) ten years of a defeated nation?
Why didn't the allies expect the Swastika on Scandinavian runestones to be deleted as well? Because that would be extreme narrow minded - But where is the limit between runestones and national Finnish insignia??
And why didn't black uniforms get banned too? That would be quite on the same narrow minded level!
.
The commonly known word Fascism originates from the similar use of the fasces-symbol by the Mussolini regime, but the fasce wasn't likely banned - Strange!

Edited by Armand, 16 May 2016 - 12:02 PM.


#10 Romantic Technofreak

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 05:34 PM

I only want to add this picture (from the San Diego Air and Space Museum's Flickr account) of a Ryan Brougham

 

3731346436336638.jpg

 

to show there was a widespread use of this symbol as one for luck before it became one for atrocity from being abused by the Nazis.

 

Regards, RT


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