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FIAT C.R.42 FALCO PERFORMANCE / TIMELINE


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#11 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 07:25 PM

 " The real problem with the Gladiator was that its insufficient medium altitude speed rendered almost

impossible the interception of the faster S.M.79s, and in fact during the campaign Gladiators (which lost at

least two of their numbers in the process) only shot three of these machines down." 

 

 

Interesting, this was the very thing which wore swedish F19 Gladiators down when they were in air defence of northern Finland during Winter War. They needed to run extended times on full throttle in attempt to catch the soviet bombers.


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#12 CORSNING

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Posted 22 May 2016 - 06:29 PM

                                                             Fiat C.R.42 Falco (Falcon) Timeline

 

Early 1939: 1st flight of the C.R.42 prototype. Maximum speed reached was 438 kph./5300 m. (272 mph./17,400 ft.)

     1,000 m./1' 25",   6,000 m./7' 20".   The engine was a Fiat a.74 R1C.38: 840 cv. 3-blade Fiat-Hamilton Standard

     3 D.41-1 propeller. No armor or radio equipment.

 

May 1939: C.R.42s enter service with the 53 Stormo.

 

Late 1939: 17 of 52 C.R.42s have been exported to Hungary. The order is completed by mid-1940.

 

February 1940: The first of 72 C.R.42 aircraft are delivered to Sweden as J 11s.

     Fiat A74R.1C.38: 870 cv.,  20 mm. armor plate behind the pilot,   Radio equipment,   Skis.

 

6 March 1940: The first of 34 C.R.42s are delivered to Sweden as J 11s.10

 

10 June 1940: Italy declares war on France and Britain.

 

3 July 1940: The C.R.42 encounters Hurricanes for the first time over Malta. The following is from an observation of

     a Hurricane pilot who encountered several Falcos. " The maneuverability of the C.R.42s, in particular their capacity

     to execute an extremely tight half roll, has caused considerable surprise to other (RAF) pilots and undoubtedly

     saved many Italian fighters from destruction." " As I fired he half rolled very tightly and I was completely unable to

     hold him, so rapid were his maneuvers," " In two cases as they (Falcos) came out of their roll, they were able to

     turn almost on my tail and opened fire on me."

 

13-14 August 1940: The 1st night interception was flown by Capitano Giorgio Graffer. Guns jammed, Graffer rammed

     an Armstrong Whitworth Whitley then bailed out. The Whitley crashed into the English Channel on the return flight.

 

September 1940: The 56 Stormo, Corpo Aero Italiano (Italian Air Corp) is formed with 50 C.R.42s & 48  G.50ss

     and moved to Ursel and Maldegen in Belgium to join in the Battle of Britain with the Luftwaffe.

 

October 1940: War against Greece began. One Gruppo of C.R.32s + one Gruppo C.R.42s and two Gruppo

     G.50s vs. 44 Greek fighters: 30 PZL P.XXLV, 2 Gladiators, 7 Avia B.534s and 5 Bloch 151s.

 

Note: "The robustness and reliability of the C.R.42 was to stand it in good stead in difficult terrain and weather

     conditions prevailing in Greece..."

 

11 November 1940: Falcos cross the Channel for the first time for a raid on Harwich.

 

January 1941: Most Falcos return to Italy leaving two squadrons, 352 and 353 of 20 Gruppo in Belgium until April.

 

October 1941: The first C.R.42 Cassia Nocturnas (Night Fighters) unit is formed in Sicily, 171 Gruppo C.N.

 

7 September 1943: When the armistice was signed four Falcos were flown to the Allied line to join the

     C0-Belligerent Force in Southern Italy.

 

November 1943: German unit Nachtschlachtgruppe (NSGr.) 9, based in Udin. 1. Staffel received its C.R.42s.

 

8 February 1945: A C.R.42 LW piloted by an unidentified German pilot shot down a P-38 to be the last biplane

     victory of the war.

 

Sources:

     "Profile Publication No.16" by Gianni Cattaneo

     "GLADIATOR vs. C.R.42 FALCO 1940-41" by Hakan Gustavson & Ludovico Slongo

     "The Chianti Raiders: The Extraordinary Story of the Italian Air Force in the Battle of Britain" by Peter Haining   


Edited by CORSNING, 23 May 2016 - 07:16 PM.


#13 Armand

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 05:25 PM

Trivia: The Swedes attempted to upgrade from the Gladiator wich had become obsolete very fast.
The deal was detoured cause the outbreak of WW2, and the plane to replace the Gladiator went being the CR.42 :-o

#14 CORSNING

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 07:45 PM

J11 Swedish Fiat CR.42 Performance

 

The following information has been supplied by my good friend Michele M. Gaetani.

It comes from "J11 FIAT CR 42" by Mikael Forslund.

 

Altitude / Speed / Avg. Climb / Time to Alt. / Speed with skis

Meters / kph - mph / fpm avg. / minutes / kph - mph 

S.L.       338 - 210                                     335 - 208.5

1,000                         2,051         1.6   

2,000                         1,930         3.3

3,000                         2,051         4.9

4,000    405 - 251,7   2,051         6.5         400 - 248.5            
5,000                         1,640         8.5

6,000                         1,172       11.5

7,000                            800       15.4

8,000                            386       23.9

 

Service Ceiling: 8,400 m. (27,559 ft.)

 

Range: 1,085 km. (674 mls.),   With Skis: 1,075 km. (668 mls.)

 

Test Weight: 2,500 kg. (5,512 lbs.)

 

Engine: Fiat A.74 RC.38: 960 cv. (947 hp.)

 

Wing Area: 240.573 sq. ft.

 

Wing Loading: 22.91+lbs./sq. ft.

 

Power Loading: 5.820+lbs./hp.



#15 CORSNING

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Posted 10 June 2016 - 07:31 PM

Fiat CR.42 Falco CA.446 (Early Tests) June-July 1938

 

     The following specifications and test results have been provided by my good friend Michele M. Gaetani.

They are from early testing of CR.42 No. CA.446 in a clean and light condition. The armament was 2 x 12.7mm

with 400 rpg. The maximum capacity of ammunition for the Breda-SAFATs is 500 rpg. For these tests 93 imperial

gallons of fuel was carried at take-off, not the 101 imperial gallon maximum.

 

Altitude / Speed / Climb Avg. / Time to Alt.

Meters / kph - mph / avg. fpm. / min.' sec."

S.L.   343/346 - 213/215

1,000     364 - 226    3,028      1' 05"

2,000     383 - 238    2,590      2' 21"

3,000     409 - 254    2,812      3' 31"

4,000     431 - 268    2,556      4' 48"

4,750     441 - 274    2,343     

5,000     439 - 273    2,289      6' 12"

5,300     438 - 272   

6,000     430 - 267    2,289      7' 38"

7,000     418 - 260    1,555      9' 49"

7,500                           660    12' 18"

 

Service Ceiling: 10,100 m. (33,136 ft.)

 

Range (93 imp. gal.): 573 mls. /223 mph./19,127 ft./2,100 rpm. engine speed.

 

Test Weight: 2,294 kg. (5,512 lbs.)

 

Wing Area: 241.111 sq. ft. (this is the only place I have seen listing it higher than 240.573 sq. ft.)

 

Wing Loading: 20.98+lbs./sq. ft. (@ 241.111 sq. ft.), 21.03- lbs./sq. ft. (@ 240.573 sq. ft.)

 

Power Loading: 5.348 lbs./hp. @ 3,000 m.

 

I would stress, that while the CR.42 was capable of these figures, they were not the norm

under combat situations in North Africa or the MTO.


Edited by CORSNING, 10 June 2016 - 07:34 PM.


#16 CORSNING

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Posted 11 June 2016 - 03:28 PM

The Fiat CR.42 Drive Train

 

     The following is excellent information supplied by my good friend Michele M. Gaetani. Michele, if

you read this, I need guidance information stating where it came from, please.

 

     " The propulsion of the Fiat Fighter was of American origin for both engine and propeller. The two-row

14-cylinder 1,904 cu. in. Fiat A74 R1C38 engine was a 1935 derivative of the famous Pratt & Whitney

Twin Wasp: apart form the longer stroke of the Fiat, the main difference was the crankshaft of Italian

design. A compact engine (frontal area 12.2 sq. ft.), the A74 R1C38 weighed 1,312 lbs. dry. More

conservatively rated than its American ancestor, it developed 860-900 (metric) HP for take-off at sea level

(+2.5 psi and 2,520 rpm.), 740 HP at S.L. and 840 HP at 12,467 ft. (3,800 m.) maximum continuous, +0.5

psi and 2,400 rpm.), 840 HP at 14,108 ft. (4,300 m.) (for a few minutes at maximum speed, +0.5 psi and

2,520 rpm.) and 960 hp. (metric) at 3,000 m. (war emergency power for a few minutes, +2.5 psi and 2,520 rpm.).

The engine (heavier but more streamlined than the (Gladiator's) Mercury) was geared to a three-blade

variable-pitch constant-speed Fiat-Hamilton propeller, which assured a much more efficient exploitation of

the engine's power than the (Gloster Gladiator's) Mercury's fixed-pitch ones.






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