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FIAT C.R.42 FALCO PERFORMANCE / TIMELINE


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#1 CORSNING

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 05:13 PM

Fiat C.R.42 Falco (Falcon) M.M.4443

 

     The following information was supplied by Dago Wop (member name on another site). It is from a document from the V Department with a heading of STATO Maggiore R. Aeronautica.

 

Altitude / Speed / Avg.Climb / Time to altitude

Meters / kph-mph / fpm / minutes' seconds"

2,000    393-244  

3,000    412-256   2,534  3'53"

4,000    429-267   2,116  5'26"

5,000    426-265   1,988  7' 5"

6,000                    1,587  9' 9"

 

Full throttle height: 431 kph - 267.8 mph./4,500 m.

 

Service Ceiling: 10,150 m. (33,300 ft.)

 

Armament: 2 x 12.7 mm./400 rpg.

 

Wing Area: 240.573 sq. ft.

 

Test Weight: 2,287 kg. (5,042 lbs.)

 

Engine: Fiat A.74 R.C.38: 870 cv./T.O.,  840 cv. maximum continuous flight., 960 cv. 3 minute emergency power @ 2,520 rpm., 890 mm/Hg./ 3,000 m.

 

Wing Loading: 20.958+lbs./sq. ft.

 

Power Loading: 5.330-lbs./hp.

 

Range internal fuel: 785 km./345 kph./6,000 m. (487 mls./214 mph./19,658 ft.) with 305 kg. (~109 US gallons)

                                fuel.

                              1,015 km./345 kph./6,000 m. (630 mls./214 mph./19,685 ft.) with 400 kg. (~143 US gallons)

                               fuel.

 

Range maximum 22 imperial gallon auxiliary tank: 630 mls..

 

cr-42-3.jpg


Edited by CORSNING, 22 April 2016 - 04:26 PM.


#2 CORSNING

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Posted 14 May 2016 - 07:16 PM

Fiat C.R.42 Manual C.A.446 (1940)

 

All the following information has been supplied by my friend Michele M. Gaetani.

 

Altitude / Speed / Avg. Climb / Time to Alt.

Meters / kph - mph / fpm avg./ min.' sec."

S.L.       342 - 213 /

1,000    360 - 224 / 2317 /      1' 25"

2,000    378 - 235 / 2317 /      2' 50"

3,000    397 - 247 / 2317 /      4' 15"

4,000    415 - 257 / 2317 /      5' 40"

5,000    430 - 267 / 1969 /      7' 20"

6,000    430 - 267 / 1969 /      9' 00"

 

Stalling Speed: 128 kph. (79.5 mph.)

 

Service Ceiling: 10,200 m. (33,465 ft.)

 

Armament: 2 x 12.7 mm. Breda-SAFAT/400 rpg.

 

Engine: Fiat A.74 R.C.38: 947 hp. for 3 minutes emergency.

 

Wing Area: 240.573 sq. ft.

 

Combat Weight: 2,295 lg. (5,060 lbs.)

 

Wing Loading: 21.03+lbs./sq. ft.

 

Power Loading: 5.343+lbs./hp.



#3 flying kiwi

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 01:50 AM

On paper, it seems slightly superior to the Gladiator, but the Gladiator is claimed to have won combat at a ratio of 1.2:1. However, it seems the Falco was better at downing bombers than the Gladiator. This may have been a function of the heavier calibre armament.



#4 Armand

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 11:24 AM

On paper, it seems slightly superior to the Gladiator, but the Gladiator is claimed to have won combat at a ratio of 1.2:1.


Isn't 1,2:1 almost even?
Would You place a bet on such odds??

#5 CORSNING

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Posted 17 May 2016 - 09:37 PM

Mr. Gaetani has supplied me with an abundance of information that I am still reading through and studying.

I really should wait until I have completely studied all of it but some statements recently posted require

answers. (In-other-words I'm a kid in a candy store with the lids off all the jars so I can't wait) :) .

 

The following quotes come from ' Desert Prelude Vol.2 "Operation Compass", 2010 by Ludovico Slongo and

H. Gustavsson. They also are the authors of Gladiator vs. C.R.42 Duel, Osprey 2012. (The 1.2:1 exchange

rate mention above comes from page 70 of this book.)

 

     "Lighter than the C.R.42, with the same power installed, a slightly greater wingspan and the benefit of split

trailing edge flaps on all four wings, the Gloster Gladiator was more manoeuverable than its Italian opponent,

also retaining a similar speed up to around 3000 metres, while above that height the Fiat was definitely faster.

The radio equipment and a more effective armament of four Colt-Browning 0.303" machine guns made the

Gladiator a slightly better dogfighter than the Italian biplane. This was also confirmed by the outcome of the

encounters that the two types experienced in the early part of the conflict. In particular, during the first North

African camqaign, on the relatively few occasions in which the two fighters clashed 22-23 C.R.42s were shot

down by the Gloster biplanes in exchange for 15-24 Gladiators, with a victory to loss ratio that goes from

around 1:1 to 1.4:1 in favour of the Commonwealth units (the wider range on the number of Gladiators lost

to Italian action comes from the fact that very often losses suffered during a specific combat were attributed

by the British pilots to engine breakdowns, collisions with friendly aircraft, return fire or simply not identified

causes; this didn't apply to Italian losses). Results that give a ratio closer to 1:1 (or even in Italian favour)

were obtained in East Africa and over the Mediterranean, while over Greece the Gladiators were able to

gain a clear margin of superiority over the Falcos, and it seems that such benefits as radio equipment and

closed cockpit had a greater effect in the cold and cloudy environment of the winter sky over the Greek

mountains."

     " The real problem with the Gladiator was that its insufficient medium altitude speed rendered almost

impossible the interception of the faster S.M.79s, and in fact during the campaign Gladiators (which lost at

least two of their numbers in the process) only shot three of these machines down." "...against the Glosters

the Italian bombers were able to operate without escort and almost with impunity. On the other hand, the

Fiat fighters and the Falco in particular were much more effective against British bombers, with around

30 Blenheims shot down or obliged to force land or crash land, notwithstanding the highly ineffective

warning network."

   "...Commonwealth aircraft, even when outmaneuvered and hit during a combat, were often able to

disengage and return home, sometimes ending with a crash-landing or a force-landing that very often

resulted in the recovery of the shot down machine. Italian planes on the other hand, not being armoured,

were much easier to be fatally hit by the rifle caliber Browning fire, this resulting also in a much superior

number of casualties among pilots and crews."

     "...Spanish 'tricks' that the Italian pilots adopted frequently: the preference for the head on attack in

order to use one of the very few advantages their machine gave them that was the longer range of their

12.7 mm. gun (only one, because it seems that in 1939-1940 Fiat had to substitute one of them with a

7.7 mm. in most C.R.42 and all the C.R.32s possibly to save weight but apparently because of a

general lack of this kind of weapon,..."


Edited by CORSNING, 18 May 2016 - 01:53 PM.


#6 CORSNING

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Posted 17 May 2016 - 09:54 PM

I am not going to continue to clutter up the C.R.42 Performance thread with information that clearly

belongs on another. I apologize at this time and ask if there is a previous Gladiator vs. C.R.42 thread? 

 

     With that, I throw into the ring the fun of comparing the Polikarpov I-153. I have not researched

the answer at this time...but I will, :)  ;)



#7 Armand

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Posted 17 May 2016 - 10:37 PM

.......and the benefit of split trailing edge flaps on all four wings, the Gloster Gladiator was more manoeuverable.....

I wonder whether this flaps actual are the ailerons as I only find flaps under the inner lower wing :-/

Edited by Armand, 17 May 2016 - 10:43 PM.


#8 CORSNING

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 02:31 PM

     " While there is enough evidence that an attempt of studying the characteristics of the enemy planes was  

carried out also by Regia Aeronautica and that the combat tactics of the Fiat units evolved during the conflict,

making them able to finally prevail over the Gladiators by using the superior medium-high performances of

there plane, after the heavy beatings suffered dogfighting at low altitude, during the summer; this seems not

the result of any effort made by Regia Aeronautica HQ but the outcome of the daily experience of the pilots

fighting in the sector."



#9 CORSNING

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 03:20 PM

     " ..., according to Slongo & Gustavsson's Desert Prelude, ' up to December 1940, the Fiat biplanes

demonstrated a slight superiority over the Hurricane in dogfights (7 Fiats shot down for the loss of 9

Hurricanes in the whole Mediterranean, North African and East African areas.' " " Note that 'Fiat

biplanes' indicates both C.R.42s and C.R.32s (the latter shooting down at least two Hurricanes in

East African areas)."

     " As Slongo explains in his Osprey (page 72), what made the difference between Italian and British

fighters was the use of the radio: the Italians neglected it (even though the early C.R.32 had been

issued with a complete receiving and transmitting radio set, which was later removed to save weight).

Note that the Finnish G.50s were equipped with the British radio sets stripped from the obsolescent

Gladiators - and the Finns were extremely proficient with the radio! "



#10 CORSNING

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 03:28 PM

     " Once the figures are reset, it is interesting to see how they arise from the

confrontation between the two fighters. A comparative look at the two types in light

of research recently conducted by Michele Maria Gaetani shows that the Fiat was

definitely the best machine in respect to its performance. Although its rate-of-climb

was similar to that of the Gladiator up to 3,000 m...., the C.R.42 was much faster

 above that altitude up to 5,000 m.... owing to its smaller wing area, constant-speed

propeller and the superior power of its engine, which could provide up to 960 hp.

(960 cv.) for short periods at emergency rating. It was in maneuverability that the

Falco lost its edge, the Gladiator definitely being better in this respect."






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