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Lookout Air Raids - Japanese Bombing On Us

Japanese Glen US Bombing Oregon

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#1 Paolo Tagliaferri

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Posted 04 June 2015 - 07:15 AM

Hi,

Trough another site I have ran into this story http://en.m.wikipedi...okout_Air_Raids

So apparently a "Glen" floatplane bombed a forest in Oregon with the intention of starting a fire, which didn't succeed. Quite interesting also to learn what the pilot did in the postwar.

Does anyone live near the area and knows more detail?

Cheers

Paolo Tagliaferri

Board Administrator

 


#2 hurriTim

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Posted 19 July 2015 - 10:53 PM

Reading those details I was amazed the Japanese pilot came to the states post war and gave his family's 400 year old sword to the town out of regret for the bombing. Really interesting read.

#3 Armand

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 06:13 PM

One gets remembrances of the movie '1941' :-)

#4 GregP

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Posted 27 July 2015 - 09:20 AM

I had a very good Japanese friend who passed away some 20 years ago and we had some discussions about the war. His parents were in the USA when the war began and were interned and lost a lot of property, and he strill had relativers in Japan. He said that a LOT of Japanese people did not want a war to start but, once started, felt obligated to fight for their country. He said that Kamakaze pilots did NOT want to die, but were brought up in a society in which doing one's duty was revered above all else except maybe honor.

 

The Japanese people were mollified when they learned after the war that war had not yet been declared when Pearl Harbor was attacked due to the time required to translate the code. Part of the problem with teaching the war history in Japan deals with the attack happening before declaration of war and the subsequent loss of the war. Neither is really acceptable to a lot of people with a traditional Japanese sense of honor. Basically you did what honor and duty demanded, even if it meant killing or being killed.

 

Our talks were revealing. I have little way of checking the reality of the matters we discussed, but we were friends and engineers troigether at Motorola Government Electroinics Group in Scottsdale, Arizona for years and I have no doubt he was telling me what was the truth, at least to him and his family. We rode motorcycles together and exchanged barbs/greetings on Pearl Harbor day and VE Day for 10+ years. I miss him still today, and think a greeting to him every Dec 7.



#5 Armand

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 12:56 PM

@Greg P: Though born a decade after the war and in Scandinavia, I've always perceived the interning of the japanese population as a betrayal.
Your script doesn't mention how deep the loyality did stick in the early generation(s) japanese immigrants, hence If there was any rightfully thoughts behind the interning :-/

#6 GregP

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 04:17 AM

My friend Warren Fuwa said that his family were firmly on the US side, having immigrated here, but that there were some Japanese in the camps who were loyal to Japan or had "divided loyalties." Therefore, according to Warren, he "understood" what happened, but was still a bit bitter about his family losing everything. They "took" the property and money of the Japanese interees and never restored it. He said everyone undertstood why we couldn't tell who was a loyal US citizen and who wasn't, but were a bit "miffed" (my mild word) that we didn't do the same with German Americans.

 

As a US citizen who was born after WWII, I have NO insight into what the thinking was at the time. After Pearl Harbor was attacked, there were probably some "reprisals" against innocent Japanese Americans. For all I know, some might have been spies ... probably not on a large scale at any rate.

 

I can tell you that I had conversations with my grandparents and their generation in general, and the thinking was not anything NEAR modern thinking ... for any nation in the world. There was no internet. There wasn't a lot of internation travel relative to the general population. People were born and rasied and somethines never went farther away than 20 - 25 miles from home ... from birth to death. They did not decide things like we might today.

 

In this forum, people have suggested maybe we should have bought British aircraft. During WWII, we didn't think like that (and neither did the British ... they did because a world war started and the survival of GB was at stake) and it would NEVER have happened as a primary warplane. We were isolationist, were NOT in a war, and there was no way we'd have bought other than American. It took Pearl Harbor to get us into the war, for crying out loud.

 

So why they interred Japanese Americans (other than it being easier to distinguish them than Germans), I can't say. I bet many Chinese and Koreans, etc. were rounded up as "Japanese,": but have no way to know that. It is an assumption on my part.

 

At the time the war started, I might have been in favor of interring Japanese in the USA, I can't say since I was not around and wasn't raised in the same sort of situation. As a child, we toured Europe, went to the Phillippines, and several other places and I didn't think of the rest of the eworld as all that strange. I met nice people in Germany, Italy, France, the UK, Belgium, the Phillippines, Canada, Mexico, and some in South America. So I wasn't exactly "isolated" from the world at large. In the teens and twenties, when the people who were making the decisions in WWII were forming their opinions, many had not gone anywhere at all except around their own hometown or farm.

 

So, my opinion of whether or not it was right to round up Japanese Americans is 80 years out of step with the reaility of the times. I have no opinion at this time about the rightness or wrongness relative to 1941. One thing I CAN say, there were a damned sight fewer laws in 1941 than there are now! There is almost nobody in the USA today who can say with any degree of accuracy how things were except the folks in their late 80's to 90's. I have asked a few, but I have seen almost no younger people try to get an idea of what was going on when WWII started by talking with the few remaining people who were there when it happened.

 

Too bad ...



#7 Armand

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 01:45 PM

TNX for insight!

#8 CORSNING

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 07:51 PM

A great post Greg. Thank you, Jeff.







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