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Did the Sopwith Triplane Have Flaps?

sopwith triplane

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#1 BSquared18

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 08:47 PM

Hello,

 

I'm building a flight sim model of the Sopwith Triplane for X-Plane.

 

Today my research for the project brought me to an April, 1918, copy of Flight & the Aircraft Engineer, in which was an article about the Sopwith Triplane.

 

The article was based on German information about a captured Triplane, so it could not be verified by the magazine. But what surprised me was that the article said, "All the wings are fitted with wing flaps connected by a vertical steel band." I've studied several plans of the Triplane but cannot see anything that indicates the presence of flaps.

 

The same statement about flaps is made in a book titled Textbook of Applied Aeronautic Engineering. But the wording is exactly the same as that in the article, so perhaps the information came from that source without being verified.

 

Anyone know whether the Sopwith Triplane had flaps?

 

Thanks,

Bill



#2 Edgar Brooks

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 10:33 PM

I suspect you'll find that flaps = ailerons; that report was made before we adopted the French name for them.



#3 Kutscha

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 12:20 AM

As Edgar says. Part No. is AGS 347.



#4 BSquared18

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 03:17 AM

Thank you. Something often seems obvious once it's pointed out.

 

Bill



#5 Armand

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 10:50 AM

Extension of the subject:
Early planes did warp the entire (flimsy) airfoil to control rolling
Is flaps/ailerons on the british triplane an invention that surprised the hun's, causing them to take notes!
Or in other words: How did the german planes between '14 and '18 control roll?
Anyone??

#6 Kutscha

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 11:04 AM

Wing warping did not last long for all the combatants.

 

The Albatros B.I of 1913 had ailerons.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aileron

 



#7 BSquared18

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 12:54 PM

While on the subject of ailerons, does anyone know the degrees of deflection for ailerons, rudder, and elevator on the Sopwith Triplane?

 

I've searched a lot of resources without finding this bit of information. If unable to get that data for the Triplane, I'll look at what builders of X-Plane models of similar aircraft used.

 

By the way, for anyone who uses SketchUp, there's an excellent 3D model of the Sopwith Triplane in the SketchUp Warehouse. I will be using it as the skin (with animation added) for the model I'm building.

 

Bill



#8 Armand

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 09:42 PM

Wing warping did not last long for all the combatants.
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aileron


Not that I did claim it hadn't ailerons, but just a short look at a DR.1 picture makes me remember it's significant aileron design :-o

#9 Kutscha

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 10:03 PM

Bill, the Shuttleworth Collection has a Triplane. Have you asked them?

 

There is also this board, http://www.theaerodrome.com/forum/ if you haven't tried yet.

 

Armand, did you know that the Triplane had variable stab trim (like on the Bf109)?

 

What do you mean by 'significant aileron design'?



#10 Armand

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Posted 02 November 2014 - 09:55 AM

 Armand, did you know that the Triplane had variable stab trim (like on the Bf109)?


Nope! Actual I'm in the phase of pic-investigation to conclude how the steel band as mentioned: "...wing flaps connected by a vertical steel band" looks/works.
To me it seems that the three ailerons on same side works with different angles - Is that right or just a distortion of the pic's I've seen?
 

What do you mean by 'significant aileron design'?


It's more external by extending the chord and is build longer than the wing (to give space for the force-neutralizing leading edge)

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