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Most reliable WW1 plane in the air?

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13 replies to this topic

#1 Armand

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 12:59 PM

Since there after all are some WW1 survivors as well as several replicas wich still flyes:
Wich is considered as the most reliable in the air, and would this still be a relict-like compared to planes of the 20's or later?
Anybody who knows quotations of such, younger than 1918?

#2 CORSNING

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 10:30 PM

Hi Armand,

 

I haven't been ignoring this question. I am just not that versed on WW1 aircraft and have not had any time to research the question.

This one is just going to have to be answered by the more educated in this field. 

 

Jeff



#3 Ricky

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 08:17 AM

Ditto.

 

At Shuttleworth, they regularly fly older aircraft (I think the oldest is from 1910?) but only for short hops at airshows.



#4 Armand

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 10:28 PM

In the meantime I've come past (Herbert Smith story) a mention of the known to be eminent Sopwith Camel, wich stated that it was quite dangerous due to it's agility and caused many unexperied pilots dead during training!
In other words, (surprisingly?) the Camel wouldn't be a contender to the title.
In NZ there is what seems as a regular mass production of Fokker triplanes, but wheter this is out of pure fanaticism due to the hype of the Red Baron or it's reasoned in the triplane's ability in the air has to be unsolved for me.

#5 Edgar Brooks

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 06:59 AM

Vimy? (It crossed the Atlantic non-stop.)
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#6 Kutscha

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 01:12 PM

Would say the number of Fokker Triplane is because of Snoopy and the Rot Baron. In real life it suffered wing failures. It was also slow and had poor altitude performance.

 

Not only Fokker Triplanes in NZ.

http://thevintageavi...-wairarapa-2011



#7 Armand

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 07:30 PM

If only the hype is out of Snoopy and the cursed Red Baron, there should be a likely amount of Camel's :-/
https://www.facebook...?type=3:-o
They likely produces their own Gnome Rhone replicas, wich indicates some serious affection :-)

#8 ChrisMcD

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 09:22 PM

Attached File  Bristol fighter.jpg   46.91KB   0 downloadsBeing a Brit I am biased, but would suggest the Bristol Fighter F2.

 

The RR Eagle was about as reliable as any WW1 engine could be - not like those nasty rotaries! 

 

And Bristol did tend to build airframes like brick sh**thouses - the Shuttleworth collection still flies theirs every so often AFAIK

 

And my grandfather flew this one with 20Sqn RAF

 

 



#9 Ricky

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 09:32 AM

There are two discussions here IMO -

 

Most Reliable

 

and

 

Least likely to kill the pilot

 

 

For example, the Sopwith Camel was known for being deadly to inexperienced pilots (I have a memory that after it was first introduced pilots were too scared to perform violent manoeuvres and so were shot down a lot) but wasn't necessarily any less reliable than any contemporary rotary-engined aircraft of the time.

 

 

Good call on the Brisfit though, as far as I know it scores well in both categories.

Mind you, you could argue that it had a very negative effect on future aircraft procurement, being as it was a twin-seater that could mix it with single-seaters. 



#10 Armand

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 06:53 PM

I purposely used the team 'reliable in the air' to exclude engine-liability. I probably should have written ' trustworthy flight characteristics'!
But the idea isn't that doll steady aircrafts is to surpass more agile planes as there must be some worthfull contenders in betweenthese two points!





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