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BREWSTER F2A PERFORMANCE/TIMELINE


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#11 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 12:07 PM

He may have flown it but did not score any victories:

 

30.06.41 LeLv 24 lentomestari Pyotsia, Viktor BW-376 1.00 SB-2bis 8.50 1.00 Okay
08.07.41 LeLv 24 lentomestari Pyotsia, Viktor BW-376 1.00 I-153 9.50 2.00 Okay
18.08.41 LeLv 24 lentomestari Pyotsia, Viktor BW-376 0.50 I-153 10.00 2.50 Okay
27.09.41 LeLv 24 lentomestari Pyotsia, Viktor BW-376 0.50 I-153 10.50 3.00 Okay
06.10.41 LeLv 24 lentomestari Pyotsia, Viktor BW-376 0.50 SB-2bis 11.00 3.50 Okay
15.10.41 LeLv 24 lentomestari Pyotsia, Viktor BW-376 1.00 AR-2 12.00 4.50 Okay
18.04.43 LeLv 24 lentomestari Pyotsia, Viktor BW-382 1.00 Jak-1 13.00 8.00 Okay
18.04.43 LeLv 24 lentomestari Pyotsia, Viktor BW-382 1.00 LaG-5 14.00 9.00 Okay
09.03.44 LeLv 24 lentomestari Pyotsia, Viktor BW-375 1.00 DB-3 15.00 14.50 Okay

 

http://www.warbirdforum.com/scores.htm

 

 

Thank you Herakulman. If my sources are correct that bird was the mount of Lentomestari Viktor Pyotsia.?

 

 

-<HR>-

Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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#12 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 05 December 2015 - 10:37 AM

Another treat:

 

vl_humu.jpg

 

Know what this is? ;)


Edited by Heräkulman Ruhtinas, 05 December 2015 - 10:37 AM.

-<HR>-

Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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#13 CORSNING

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Posted 05 December 2015 - 12:48 PM

Very nice picture Herakulman. The aircraft is the one and only VL Humu. The Finnish State Factory attempted to develop the Buffalo in 1944. The aircraft frame was metal however the rest of the aircraft was wood. The aircraft was mated with the Russian Shvetsov M-63 engine of the Polikarpov I-16 type 24. Because of its mostly wooden construction it had gained about 550 lbs. The power to weight ratio of the aircraft left it with a maximum speed of less than 270 mph. and maximum climbing ability of just over 2,600 fpm. The armament of 2 x 12.7 mm LKK/42 machine guns was inadiquate and the performance was no where up to 1944 standards so the project was dropped. 

 

Jeff :)  B)


Edited by CORSNING, 05 December 2015 - 07:27 PM.

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#14 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 05 December 2015 - 03:16 PM

Yes,

 

even after they left any armor and some other stuff off, the end result was some 250kg heavier. Also we only received the engine manuals in 1943 and after that they managed to tune the engine right...

 

But it had 3 x 12.7mm LKK/42 in fuselage and that was regarded as better than B-239 (btw, LKK/42 is copy of Colt M2)


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#15 Heräkulman Ruhtinas

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 05:09 PM

Just recently heard that there was one Finnish B239 tested with 1200hp Wright Cyclone engine (probably taken from Curtiss Hawk) and the performance with that was very good, it allegedly climbed in par with Bf109G. There is test report of that in the collection of documents in the museum of aircraft engineering in Jämsä, Halli, Finland.


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#16 CORSNING

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 06:57 PM

Now that is a test report I would like to look over. :)

 

     Just letting everyone know that I have come across more performance figures for the B-239.

A special thank you goes out to Michele M. Gaetani for the information. I have edited my post

#3 with the new information. B)


Edited by CORSNING, 19 June 2016 - 07:42 PM.


#17 CORSNING

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 05:00 PM

The following information comes from Flying to the Limit by Peter Caygill;

 

Vs. Bf.109E

     Poor performance and inadequate hitting power.

 

Squadron Leader Walter Churchill DSO DFC; The aircraft is not a fighter until the following

     corrections are made;

     1. Firepower needs to be increased. The 2 x 0.5 in. + 2 x 0.3 in. is inadequate.

     2. A reflector gunsight is needed.

     3. Armor protection for the pilot needs to be increased. Present armor is inadequate.

     4. Shoulder straps through the seat do not give proper security to the pilot. The straps

         need to go over the seat.

     5. This aircraft would make an excellent trainer, relatively simple and delightful to aerobatics.

 

R.A.E. comparison to the Hawker Hurricane

     The Buffalo's take-off run was shorter.

     Acceleration and climb was good (comparable) 

     The metal ailerons were exceptionally effective, crisp and powerful. The Buffalo could easily

     turn inside the Hurricane.

     The elevator (and ailerons) were not sensitive like the Spitfire's or sloppy like the Hurricane's.

     The Buffalo could outroll a Spitfire (or Hurricane) using less force at speeds over 200 mph.

     I.A.S.

     The Buffalo's overall maneuverability was excellent.


Edited by CORSNING, 27 July 2016 - 05:02 PM.


#18 CORSNING

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:19 PM

Brewster F2A (39) Buffalo Timeline

 

1932: An aeronautical engineer named James Work bought the aircraft division of

     Brewster and Co. for $30,000.

 

15 November 1935: The US Navy approves the fighter monoplane designed by Brewster.

 

22 June 1936: The US Navy orders the XF2A-1 (Model 139) to be constructed.

 

10 February 1937: Brewster and Work Engineering are legally consolidated as the

     Brewster Aeronautical Corporation.

 

2 December 1937: The first flight of the XF2A-1.

 

January 1938: The XF2A-1 is delivered to the USN for testing at NAS Anacostia, MD.

 

1 March 1938: Comparative tests are performed between the Brewster XF2A-1,

     Grumman XF4F-2 and Seversky NF-1.

 

11 June 1938: Brewster wins the test trials and 54 production F2A-1 (Model 239) are

     ordered by the USN. Engine: Wright R-1820-34: 940 hp./T.O. 750 hp./17,000 ft.

     Combat Weight: 5,055 lbs.,   Maximum Speed: 271 mph./S.L.,   301 mph./17,000 ft.

     Climb: 3070 fpm./S.L.,   Service Ceiling: 32,500 ft.,   Range (normal) 1,095 ml.

     1,680 max. Armament: 1 x 0.5 in. + 1 x 0.3 in. machine guns.

 

22 March 1939: The USN orders the XF2A-1 converted to XF2A-2 standards.

     Engine: Wright R-1820-22 (G5): 950 hp./T.O./2,200 rpm.   850 hp./2,100 rpm.

     Maximum Speed: 304 mph.,   Service Ceiling: 30,900 ft.

 

20 June 1939: Deliveries of the F2A-1 to the USN began. Wright R-1820-34:

     950 hp./T.O.,   750 hp./15,200 ft.

 

July 1939: The XF2A-2 begins flight tests with the Wright R-1820-40: 1,200 hp./T.O.

     1,000 hp./S.L. - 4,500 ft. low blower,   900 hp./9,800 - 14,000 ft. high blower.

 

August 1939: The British Purchasing Commission orders 120 Model 339 (F2A-2).

 

August 1939: Poland orders 250 F2As for $15 million that are never delivered because

     Germany invades first.

 

October 1939: The British Air Ministry declares the F2A unfit for the RAF.

 

December 1939: Eleven F2A-1s were accepted and entered service with Squadron

     VF-3 of the USN.

 

8 December 1939: Nine F2A-1s become operational aboard the USS Saratoga

     supplanting VF-3's F3F-1s.

 

January 1940: Seventeen de-navalized F2A-1s are delivered to Sweden. They were

     assembled by a team of Norwegian Air Force volunteers and tested at SAAB in

     Trollhatten, and then flown to Finland.

 

April 1940: The last of the 44 Brewster 239s (F2A-1) have reached Nr.24 & Nr.26

     Squadrons in Finland. Engine was the Wright R-1820-G5, Combat Weight: 5,820 lb.

 

10 May 1940: The first Belgian 339B is delivered with a Wright Cyclone GR-1820-G:

     1,100 hp.

 

28 May 1940: Belgium surrenders to Germany and the B-339B was still in its crate at

     Bordeaux Merignac.

 

July 1940: Six Belgium 339Bs are delivered to Martinique on the French aircraft carrier

     Bearne. USN F2A-1s on the USS Saratoga have proven to have weak landing gear.

     The first British Buffalo I (339E)s are being assembled at Burtonwood Lancashire.

 

September 1940: RAF flight test by No.71 Squadron at Church Fenton reveal the Buffalo

     is not suited for Europe.

 

September 1940: A contract for 72 B-339Bs was signed by the Netherlands Purchasing

     Commission for 24 R-1820-G105A (1,000 hp.) and 48 R-1820-G205A (1,200 hp.)

     powered aircraft.

 

7 October 1940: USN Squadron VF-2 received their first F2A-2s.

 

21 January 1941: Grumman F4F-3s are not being produced fast enough so the USN

     orders 108 F2A-3s to keep Brewster's production line going.

 

March 1941: Six Brewster 339Bs are operational with No.805 Squadron's Fairey Fulmars

     in Crete with the Fleet Air Arm.

 

April-September 1941: Seventy-one G205A powered B-339s arrived in the Netherlands

     East Indies.

 

July 1941: First F2A-3s are delivered to the US Navy.

 

8 December 1941: Thirty Dutch 339Ds are operational in the Netherlands East Indies. 

 

25 December 1941: Fourteen F2A-3s of Marine Squadron VMF-221 from USS Saratoga

     become the first fighters on Midway Island.

 

January 1942: 339E Buffalos are used in Malaya by RAF Squadrons No.67 & No.243,

     RAAF Squadrons No.21 & No.453 and RNZAF Squadron No.433. The Buffalos are

     considered to have poor performance to their adversaries.

 

4 June 1942: Two Marine groups at the beginning of the Battle of Midway consisting of

     twelve F2A-3s & thirteen F4F-3s attack 108 Japanese aircraft 30 ml. off the coast at

     12,000 ft. The defending group was essentially wiped out. One of the surviving Brewster

     pilots commented," It is my belief that any commander who orders pilots out for combat

     in an F2A should consider the pilot lost before leaving the ground."


Edited by CORSNING, 13 August 2017 - 08:35 PM.


#19 CORSNING

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 08:34 PM

Flying to the Limit by Peter Caygill

 

In September 1940 three B-339B powered by the Wright Cyclone GR-1820-G capable

of 1,100 hp. were delivered to Church Fenton. No.71 Squadron (1st Eagle Sqdn.)

Leader Walter Churchill DSO DFC commented on the following deficiencies:

1. The armament of 2 x 0.5 in + 2 x 0.3 in machine guns was too light.

2. There  was no reflector gun sight.

3. The rear armor protection was weak and there was none for the pilot's head.

4. The shoulder straps of the Sutton harness were not secured allowing the pilot to slip

     out in inverted flight.

5. The undercarriage, slap-operating & seat adjustment levers were all too small and

     difficult to operate.

6. The R/T controls were on the right-hand side requiring pilot to change hands to

     operate the radio. The pilot could possibly hit his elbow on the seat each time he

     changed from send to receive.

Churchill had several other opinions criticizing the design and construction of the Buffalo

but he concluded that it would make an excellent trainer being relatively easy to fly and

delightful for aerobatics.

 

More to come, Jeff :)


Edited by CORSNING, 13 August 2017 - 08:36 PM.





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