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HAWKER TEMPEST Mk.V PERFORMANCE / TIMELINE


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#11 CORSNING

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Posted 29 October 2015 - 07:47 PM

Tempest V vs. Me.109G

     44. The Tempest V is 40-50 mph faster up to 20,000 feet when the difference in speed rapidly diminishes.

 

Climb

     45. The Tempest is behind the Me.106G at all heights, but being almost similar below 5,000 feet. The Tempest is only slightly better in a zoom climb if the two aircraft start at the same speed, but if the Tempest has an initial advantage, it will hold this advantage easily providing the speed is kept over 250 mph.

 

Dive

     46. Initial acceleration of the Tempest is not marked, but a prolonged dive brings the Tempest well ahead.

 

Turning Circle

     47. The Tempest is slightly better, the Me.109G being embarrassed by its slots opening near the stall.

 

CORSNING Personal Note: My opinion does not agree with the author of this report (at this time) on comparative turning circles. I am not a first hand authority on either of these aircraft (at this time), however I have put many hours of research into both. From the many papers and books I have read to date, they all seem to lean toward the Bf 109G (without wing gondolas) being able to out turn the Tempest at speeds up to around 350 mph. The advantage is even greater at low speeds where the slots of the 109 give it a very pronounced advantage. 

 

Rate of Roll

     48. At normal speeds there is nothing in it, but at speeds over 350 mph the Tempest could get away from the Me.109G by making a quick change of bank and direction.

 

Conclusion

     49. In the attack, the Tempest can always follow the Me.109 except slow, steep climb. In the combat area the Tempest should maintain a high speed, and in defense may do anything except a climb at slow speed.


Edited by CORSNING, 10 November 2015 - 08:38 PM.


#12 CORSNING

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Posted 29 October 2015 - 08:10 PM

HAWKER TEMPEST V OPERATIONAL TIMELINE

 

March 1940: Hawker initiated a number of design studies aimed at improving the Typhoon.

 

18 November 1941: The RAF ordered two prototypes under Specification F.10/41. This project

     quickly became known at the Typhoon II.

 

August 1942; The project was officially named Tempest and six prototypes had now been ordered.

     The Mk.I (HM599) powered by a Sabre IV.

     The Mk.II (LA602 & LA607) powered by Centaurus IV engines.

     The Mk.III (LA610) powered by a Griffon IIB.

     The Mk.IV (LA614) powered by a Griffon 61.

     The Mk.V (HM595) powered by a Sabre II.

 

2 September 1942: 1st flight of a conversion of the Typhoon airframe (Tempest V prototype) with a thinner wing.

     Pilot was P.G. Lucas.

 

21 June 1943: 1st flight of production Tempest V.

     The Series 1 had its four Hispano Mk.II cannon protruding ahead of the wings leading edge.

     The joint between the rear fuselage and tail was reinforced.

     The rear spar pick-up end fitting was cranked in order to pick up the fuselage lugs.

     The fuselage structure of these early aircraft were converted Typhoon assemblies.

     The top wing root fillet fairing had a bulge in it in order to allow the rear spar pick up lugs to clear

          the inner housing.

 

January 1944: 1st delivery of Tempest V Series 1s to squadrons begin.   No. 486 sqdn. RNZAF at Tangmere.

 

Note: Tempest V Series I aircraft were delivered to No. 3 sqdn. soon after No. 486's first deliveries.

 

Late April 1944: 486 sqdn. and 3 sqdn. became fully operational.

 

23 April 1944: The first operational sorties of the Tempest were flown by No.3 Sqdn.

 

23 June 1944: The first air-to-air Tempest victories were scored by No.3 Sqdn. shooting down three Bf.109Gs

     without loss near Rounen.

 

June 1944: Tempest V Series II aircraft began reaching operational squadrons.

     The Series II were fitted with short-barreled Hispano Mk.V cannon allowing them to be completely enclosed.

     The built-up tubular steel fusealage rear spar pick-up structure was replaced by a one-piece casting that

          gave direct pick up and was simpler structural joint.

     The reinforcement of the rear fuselage was not necessary allowing a detachable tail unit.

     Provisions were made to allow two 45 imp. gal. drop tanks.


Edited by CORSNING, 06 May 2017 - 05:18 PM.


#13 CORSNING

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 12:48 PM

The official DATA CARDS for the Hawker Tempest V can be viewed on

wwaircraftperformance.org. This is IMO THE most informative site on

the entire net for WW2 aircraft official documentation and it is brought

to you by Mike Williams and Neil Stirling.

 

http://www.wwiiaircr...s-sabre-IIa.jpg.

Notice: This is using the Sabre IIa with +9 lbs. of boosting and at 3,700 r.p.m.

 

 

http://www.wwiiaircr...s-sabre-IIb.jpg

Notice: This is using the Sabre IIb with +11 lbs. of boosting and 3,850 r.p.m.


Edited by CORSNING, 03 May 2017 - 12:51 PM.


#14 CORSNING

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 01:23 PM

May God bless Mike Williams and Neil Stirling for all there efforts.

The following can also be viewed on:

http://www.wwiiaircr.../tempest-V.html

 

Pierre Clostermann wrote of the Tempest:

     Nothing was left undone to give the Tempest a maximum performance

at medium and low altitudes. Special auxiliary tanks were designed even, with

Perspex connecting pipes, to fit under the wings. Quite extraordinary attention

was paid to the riveting, the joints and the surface polish. The result was a superb

combat machine.

     It had a thoroughbred look and , in spite of the big radiator which gave it an

angry and wilful appearance, it was astonishingly slender. It was very heavy, all

of seven tons. Thanks to its 2,400 hp. engine it had a considerable margin of

excess power and its acceleration was phenomenal. It was pretty tricky to fly,

but its performance more than made up for it: at 3,000 feet, at economical

cruising on one third power (950hp.) with two 45-gallon auxiliary tanks, 310 mph.

on the clock, i.e. a true air speed of 320 mph.; at fast cruising speed, at half

power (1,425 hp.) without auxiliary tanks, 350 mph. on the clock, i.e. a true air

speed of nearly 400 mph.; Maximum speed  straight and level with +13 lbs.

boost and 3,850 rpm.: 430 mph. on the clock, i.e. a true airspeed of 440 mph.

     In emergencies you could over-boost it up to nearly 3,000 rpm. and 4,000 revs.,

and the speed went up to 460 mph. In a dive the Tempest was the only aircraft to

reach, without interfering with its handling qualities to any marked extent, subsonic

speeds, i.e. 550-560 mph.

 

Tempest V vs. Messerschmitts:

     I kept on reminding my pilots to keep their speed above 300 mph., for "109s" could

turn better than we could at low speed, and you had to watch out for the 30 mm. cannon

in their propeller - it didn't give you a second chance. The best technique was to do a

spiral dive, work up to a speed of 450 mph., do a straight climb and then start all over

again. The "109s" on the other hand, knowing that we dived fast than they did, tried to

get us up to 16,000 ft., where our Tempests were heavy and our engines sluggish.

 

The Rine:

     On the 30th March, six days later, I came back to Volkel in time to go to Warmwell

in the duty Anson to choose a beautiful brand-new Tempest with the new Rotal airscrew.

Two days later I was posted O.C. "A" Flight, No.3 Squadron in 122 Wing (at B.122 Rheine).

 

F/O Ronald Dennis recounted:

     All our machines were fitted with Rotol airscrews when the maximum rpm were

increased to 3,850 rpm. from 3,700 rpm. and boost to +13 from +11, as the DeHaviland

airscrew could not absorb the added power and more than once shed a blade, with

somewhat detrimental effects on the engine!.


Edited by CORSNING, 03 May 2017 - 01:57 PM.


#15 CORSNING

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 02:01 PM

     To this date I am not aware of any performance figures at the engine limitations

of +13 lbs. of boost and 3,850 rpm.

     I would be extremely grateful if anyone that may have such material would contact

me with this information.

 

Thank you in advance, Jeff






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