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Convair and the Delta Wing...


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#11 GregP

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 08:24 PM

Yes, typo. Mach 1.25 is about 825 mph at 35,000 yo 45,000 feet. Guess I "pulled" my typing finger downward by a small bit ...

#12 GregP

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Posted 26 June 2010 - 03:09 AM

725 mph or so, if I recall ...

#13 Groggy

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 09:47 AM

Hi Greg.
Agree with your comments

(side issue Metrovik F.5 UDF diameter 5ft 6in; blade length17.25in; thrust 4,710lb.
Circa 1945/46
Description details flight January 2nd 1947 page18.)

And back to the topic in 1943 at the start the Miles 52 alternate wing was a delta with all flying tail according to Bancroft the chief aerodynamicist. But this was dropped because they only had a few months to produce the aircraft and they were not sure of the low speed handling characteristics. Only reference is that this was from a conversation with Dennis Bancroft but I had a type written copy of his report on the project, might be able to find given time.

I believe Convair XF92 had originally a similar bi-convex delta wing and the Mig 21 was very similar to the M52 alternate layout.

[quote name='GregP']The F-102 was not designed after the MiG-21 at all.

The roots of the F-102 go back to late WWII when the USA started looking into delta wings. The research culminated in the Convair XF-92A, a delta wing research aircraft.




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